5 Powerful Health Benefits of Kefir (Backed by Science)

5 Powerful Health Benefits of Kefir (Backed by Science)

October 8, 2019 39 By Ewald Bahringer


– Kefir is all the rage in
the natural health community. The name is derived from
the Turkish word, keyif, which means feeling good after eating. Now, many consider kefir to
be a more powerful version of yogurt, and in this
video, I’m looking at five of its top health benefits. (xylophone chimes gently) Kefir is a fantastic
source of many nutrients. Kefir is a fermented
drink, traditionally made using cow’s or goat’s milk. It’s made by adding so-called
kefir grains to milk. This is what it looks like. The kefir grains are in the spoon, resembling cauliflower in appearance, and the kefir milk is in the charge. So basically, kefir is the
drink, but kefir grains are the starter kit that you
use to produce the drink. Kefir grains are not grains
in the conventional sense, but cultures of yeast
and lactic acid bacteria. The microorganisms in the grains multiply and ferment
the sugars in the milk, turning it into kefir. Then the grains are
removed from the liquid and can be used again. Now, during that fermentation,
the lactic acid bacteria turn the lactose in the milk
into lactic acid, so kefir tastes sour like yogurt but
has a thinner consistency. A 175 mil or six ounce
serving of milk kefir contains six grams of protein, about 20% of the RDA for calcium and phosphorus, 14% of Vitamin B-12, 19% for Vitamin B-2, five percent for magnesium, and a decent amount of Vitamin D as well. This is coming with about 100 calories, seven to eight grams of carbs, and three to six grams of fat, depending on the type
of milk that is used. Kefir also contains a wide
variety of bioactive compounds, including organic acids and peptides that contribute to its
health benefits as well. Number two, kefir is a more
powerful probiotic than yogurt. Some microorganisms can have beneficial effects on
health when ingested. These are known as probiotics
and are thought to influence health in numerous ways,
including weight management, mental health, and digestion. Yogurt is the best known
probiotic source in the Western diet, but kefir is actually
a much more rich and diverse source, with about 30 strains
of bacteria and yeasts. Other fermented dairy products
are made from fewer strains, and they don’t contain any yeasts. Number three, the probiotics
in it may health with various digestive problems. Probiotics like kefir can help restore the balance of healthy
bacteria in your gut. For this reason, there’s
also a lot of evidence that probiotics and
probiotic foods can help with all sorts of digestive problems. This includes irritable bowel
syndrome, also known as IBS, ulcers caused by H. pylori
infection, and various others. Therefore, kefir may be useful if you have problems with digestion. Number four, kefir can improve bone health and lower the risk of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is characterized
by a deterioration of bone tissue and dramatically
increased risk of fractures. Ensuring adequate calcium intake is one of the best ways
to improve bone health and slow the progression of osteoporosis. Kefir made from full-fat dairy is not only a great source of calcium,
but also Vitamin K, too, and this nutrients plays a central role in calcium metabolism, and
supplementing with it has been shown to reduce the risk of
fractures by as much as 81%. It’s no real surprise that
a recent animal study showed kefir can increase calcium
absorption by bone cells. This leads to improved bone density, which should help prevent fractures. The same authors then
did a control trial on osteoporosis patients and
found similar benefits for those who had kefir milk in addition to calcium supplementation. Number five, kefir is
generally well-tolerated by people who are lactose intolerant. Regular dairy foods contain
natural a sugar called lactose. Many people are unable to
break down and digest lactose properly, a condition known
as lactose intolerance. The lactic acid bacteria
in fermented dairy foods like kefir and yogurt turn
the lactose into lactic acid. This makes kefir much
lower in lactose than milk, and the reason it is generally
well tolerated by people with lactose intolerance. Also keep in mind that
it is possible to make kefir that is 100% lactose free. You can just use coconut
milk or coconut water or fruit juice or some other sweet liquid, but of course, it won’t
carry the same beneficial properties as kefir made on dairy. Thanks for tuning in! If you found this useful, be
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