Amla vs. Diabetes

Amla vs. Diabetes

September 13, 2019 35 By Ewald Bahringer


“Amla vs. Diabetes” Dripping plant extracts on cancer
cells in a test tube is a far cry from testing whole foods
on whole people. Another amla study published recently,
though, tried Indian gooseberries on patients with diabetes. A normal fasting blood sugar
is considered under 100. Between 100 and 125 is called
pre-diabetes, and over 125, you are, essentially,
by definition, diabetic. So, they took people with diabetes
and put them on a diabetes medication like glyburide, sold
as Diabeta or Micronase. It brings down their blood sugars. Then, researchers compared that leading
diabetes drug to a just three-quarters of a teaspoon a day of dried powdered amla —
that’s less than 2 berries a day worth. They just gave them a tiny bit of
this fruit, and it worked even better than the leading drug. So they tried half a teaspoon
a day of gooseberry powder; a quarter teaspoon a day. That’s less; that’s not even one
berry, and it still brought their sugars down into
the normal range. Here are the potential side effects
of the drug, glyburide: most commonly weight gain, feeling like you’re going
to throw up, or (rarely), your skin starts to fall off, or your liver fails,
or it poisons your bone marrow. Side effects of gooseberries? Well, I don’t know, they
taste kind of sour. Amla has been used safely for centuries,
but these researchers did actually find three dramatic side effects. In addition to bringing their blood
sugars down, amla lowered their bad cholesterol straight from
the danger zone into the happy zone. One gooseberry a day cut their bad
cholesterol in half in three weeks. Boosted their good cholesterol, and
cut their triglycerides in half! Yeah, but how expensive
is this amla stuff? How expensive are
Indian gooseberries? Most of the diabetes
drugs are generic now. You can get a three months’
supply for only like $50. So I biked over to an Indian spice store
I actually have in my neighborhood to see if they had amla,
Indian gooseberries. I was afraid they’d be like, uh, what? Instead, they were like, uh, do you
want frozen, dried, sweetened, salted, pickled, packed in syrup,
packed in nitrogen? I bought all these in a tiny
little store in a strip mall a couple blocks away
from where I live. You can tell I liked
the sweet the best. And yes, they had powdered too. A three months’ supply — three dollars! Am I recommending people treat their
diabetes with gooseberry powder? No, I recommend curing your
diabetes with a plant-based diet. Why treat anything when you can get
at the root cause and reverse it, in the first place?