From Privacy is Dead to Long Live Privacy | Thriving Amid the Ever-Morphing Future of Work | 8/10

From Privacy is Dead to Long Live Privacy | Thriving Amid the Ever-Morphing Future of Work | 8/10

January 7, 2020 0 By Ewald Bahringer


A sincere understanding of what privacy even means I think, is important. And again I’ll go back to the basics. I think my concept of privacy is very different because I was born in 1983 than perhaps Desmond’s, perhaps yours. When I think of privacy I mostly think about my credit card information, my social security number, and I think about changing my passwords frequently so that somebody doesn’t steal my identity which is my worst case scenario. But what privacy means really varies on the individual and and perhaps that’s our biggest problem. Trying to create a definition around privacy means creating subsets of what we think privacy could be. One of the thoughts that I floated in this report, in the frontier report and other stuff I’ve been writing almost as a trial balloon to see how people react to it simply this rhetorical question – Will we ever turn any of this stuff off? I mean you think it’s too late? How would I have gotten here? Michael’s not on Twitter, I’m not on Facebook. Now I’m beginning to think should I turn off Twitter? The thing I’ve noticed on my own Twitter feed is I just keep unfollowing people. But do you have an Alexa at home? And you turn that off on the weekends, do you unplug it? No. So technology is ambient, it’s everywhere. Yeah exactly, My wife unplugged the Alexa. There are names for that now – Tech hiatus, Tech Shabbat. I mean people have terms for it. That’s right, it’s like one day gonna turn into a weekend. Is a weekend gonna say turn into four days, is it gonna turn into turning the whole thing off altogether? My brother worked at Facebook and he had a very interesting way to try to finesse the privacy thing. He said it’s not about privacy it’s about the control of your own information. So that’s one way of saying it. Where do you have control, where do you not have control over information. But there’s a another point that I would like to make you know I’ll make it briefly. When I was growing up when you and I were growing up if somebody had cancer it was a secret. You did not discuss that kind of disease. If a woman had a miscarriage, it was not discussed. We have moved now. Literally literally, I’m in New York tens of thousands of men, women and children with ribbons marched through Central Park Riverside because our notions of privacy around personal health, what could be more intimate than that, have fundamentally changed. I will argue that the lack of self-consciousness about privacy and certain domains of health care has been net-net a collective good and an individual good. So I just want us to be careful here that we are not frozen in 2020 amber, regarding a backlash to certain clearly
malign aspects. [Music]