Holistic Nutritionist Elissa Goodman on Cancer, Cleanses, Stress & More

Holistic Nutritionist Elissa Goodman on Cancer, Cleanses, Stress & More

September 30, 2019 0 By Ewald Bahringer


Hi everyone. I am here today in
Los Angeles with the lovely Elissa Goodman. She is a holistic nutritionist, a lifestyle cleanse expert and
the author of Cancer Hacks. She is also a cancer survivor and
has a really incredible story about what she went through and then also what
she did with that experience to help others. I’d love to tell it and thank you for
having me in your lovely home. Thank you. I’m honored to be on your
show and to be interviewed by you. I mean, I always love this stuff, so anything to get the word out
there that we all can be healthier. Absolutely.
– In every way. Part of what my mission is at
WellBe is to show the proof. A lot of us can talk about a lot of things
but without showing that there are people who were able to reverse
chronic health conditions through an integrative
approach like you did, it’s kind of like all words up here and
not a lot of tangible, you know, facts. That’s why I really love to
showcase stories like yours. Your work and your life was really influenced by
the experience of having Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which you were diagnosed with
at 32 which is younger than me. Too young.
– Please tell us, I know you were a mom at that time
or you almost a mom at that time? I had been trying to get pregnant. It’s interesting. I don’t talk
about this that much, but I had had probably four
miscarriages before I was diagnosed, so it almost was like
the universe was saying, you know, you got to clean up your act
health-wise before you can get pregnant. Absolutely. I’ve learned more and
more about that as I’ve had friends go through miscarriages in the last couple
of years that often it’s a bit of a blessing. It’s a bit of your body saying,
“This vessel is not prepared. Let’s figure it out and then
you can maybe have that.” Tell us the story.
– Well, I wasn’t always healthy as a kid and I got every health
issue known to man. The chicken pox, the strep,
tonsillitis, the mono, the shingles. Even when I was born,
I had a low red blood cell count and I used to have to get
blood shots every 28 days. There was a lot going on there, eczema and
like all these things that people can relate to. I never had a strong immune system and I was always behind the eight ball. The other thing was I was
brought up in a Type A family who were very motivated
and very successful and actually got everything done
that they needed to get done, and here I was like sort of trying
to pick up the pieces behind them and never feeling like
I could measure up, I couldn’t get anything done,
I didn’t feel good enough. There was that emotional component that was weighing very heavy on me,
plus I had the physical component. I continued that throughout my life and
graduated college and moved to New York City and picked absolutely the worst city
probably for me in terms of health because it was so fast-paced and so crazy. The energy was so crazy,
non-stop as you know, and I got into the advertising/marketing
business which was a lot of entertaining, lot of work and basically was…
did that for 10 years and was sick all the time there as well, but always dabbling to see
what I could do to feel better. I was always reading books and
trying to find alternative methods because my mom, in the early days,
was asthmatic. She took sugar out of
the house at an early stage. She took white bread and
soda and all those things, so she was kind of on that track and so
I saw that she got better with her asthma. I was thinking, there has
to be some other ways to live and not be sick all the time
and not feel like this. Then I moved… I said to my
husband when we got married, let’s move West because
New York is too crazy for me. I just can’t see commuting into
the city, having a family and that just seems like it’s
going to take me down. We moved to L.A. and I wanted just a lower-paced life and
also more sunshine and better weather and we did and that’s when I was
diagnosed with the Hodgkin’s lymphoma and it was a wakeup call. I mean, I knew my life wasn’t
going the right direction in a lot of ways, but I didn’t
really want to focus on it and when that happened, it was scary, really scary, because you think of cancer,
all of us still this day think cancer, we might die. Yeah. I mean, I think many people do. It’s one of the few chronic
illnesses I can think of where it seems like a ticking time
bomb more than anything else. I mean, obviously a lot of them are but something about high blood pressure
or a low thyroid, you sort of feel like, “Okay, I can sort of like manage
it and get along for a while. I’m not going to feel my best.
I’m not going to be operating on my best but it’s not like if I’m not going to do anything,
I’m going to be dead in a few months,” whereas cancer is like,
“Oh my god, there’s this thing.” I think Hodgkin’s lymphoma doesn’t have
a tumor per se, right? It’s like a blood… Well, it is… you can have
tumors in the lymphatic system. They did remove a swollen lymph node, so they can be maybe not tumor-related
but they have swollen lymph nodes and it’s in the lymphatic system which travels
throughout the entire body, as you know. And that’s connected,
as you were talking about, to just having a crazy lifestyle with too many toxins
because your lymphatic system drains them out. You got it. That was a buildup of the toxins
and the buildup of the emotional toxicity. Both things. I’ve been thinking so much
about that lately, but tell me the story from getting your diagnosis to getting well. Then when I was diagnosed, I went to three
doctors and two of them were very hardcore. The cancer hadn’t been staged yet and
basically they were like, “Chemo, radiation,” you know, “We’re going to have to freeze
your eggs,” because I hadn’t had kids. “We’re going to… basically do you have a donor
because we might have to do a transplant,” and I was like, “Whoa, that’s so…
we don’t even know what stage it is. The third, it was very scary, that part. And then the third doctor that
I went to was a radiologist oncologist who kind of fell out of
the sky from a friend. I went to see him reluctantly
really because I was like, “Ugh, a third doctor. This is tiresome.”
When I went to see him, he said to me, it was staged then.
It was an early stage and he said, “What’s your life like?
Are you stressed? Are you happy? Are you living your purpose?
Just, what’s going on with you?” and I just burst into tears.
I was like, “I’m so miserable. My whole life has been
like playing catch up and not feeling good enough
and I’m constantly stressed.” I mean, I think I live in a fight
or flight mode continually because of all the things that are in my head
and also I’m not feeling good all the time. He said, “I think we could take care of this without bone marrow transplant
and freezing your eggs.” He did say that we would probably
have to do chemo and radiation but I decided, after I did some research,
I was really scared about the chemo because I hadn’t had kids and
because of my immune system, I knew both of those
things might take me down, so I chose to do half the radiation and the doctors were not happy with me because I just took it into my
own hands and I was praying that this was going to work. And then I started juicing because in L.A., there was
one juice place at that time. Now of course they
were everywhere, but I started juicing. It was not too far from where we
lived and Mrs. Gooch’s, which is Whole Foods now, all these wonderful things were in L.A. The wellness community was here.
Acupuncture, naturopaths, yoga. I started diving in to all
of that and I healed. Thank god. So you did no chemo and only half
the radiation that they wanted you to do and you just kind of then
sat back and prayed. Wow. Well, not really sat back.
You started doing all of these other therapies. I did. Proactively,
and I went into therapy, major, because I knew my emotional
stability needed to be worked on. I mean, that part of the equation is huge
and it’s bigger than most people think. Yeah. I agree with you. Lately, I’ve been
realizing how much emotional traumas that are unresolved,
whether they’re hugely significant or just perceived as
significant at a young age kind of can fester in your body
and create this inflammation which then can lead to
chronic diseases like cancer. I think that we all have microscopic
cancer cells in our body. We all have toxins. We all have bad stuff.
That doesn’t mean you’re going to get sick, but I think when you… right, when those emotional
components, that trauma raises its ugly head and we all I think have
some form of trauma too, and to learn how to let
that go is so crucial. I see in these days with
all the health issues. You got better.
How long did that take? It took about… they told me I couldn’t
try to get pregnant for two years, so it took about two years,
I would say, until I did start to feel
stronger and better. And then I got pregnant with two girls. One and then three
years later another one and they’re 23 and then 20 today. Basically, then by 11 years later, my husband was diagnosed
with Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. That was such a huge like, “Oh my god,
two parents who have had cancer.” What are the odds of that? I don’t know if there… I mean,
it might be a little more odds these days because of the environment we live in,
the stress, the toxins, all of that. Yeah, that time,
I hadn’t heard of that. I mean, very seldom. We were so similar. We were
both really high stress people and emotionally I think we felt a little bit
not good enough and not worthy. I think there were a lot of
emotional things going on with us. Not that this gives you cancer,
but he was… he loved animal protein, so he ate a ton of animal protein and as you know, in those days, we didn’t think
about organic or pasture-raised or hormone-free, and then he also was a major…
he loved sugar. After every meal, he had to have
dessert and it was crappy dessert. It was like M&M’s or things like that. We know that those things
are not the best for cancer but I’m not saying that just him
doing that caused his cancer. Besides his diet, I mean, can you
think of any other possible reason that you both could’ve gotten cancer?
It’s incredible. He passed away a year
after his treatment. His treatment was way
more intense than mine. He had two bone marrow
transplants in a year and a half, which is really unheard of, and his immune system was so compromised
so he actually didn’t die from the cancer, he died from fungal pneumonia. Basically, after he passed away,
a friend of mine said, “You know what, I just want
to test your house for EMFs.” I was like,
“EMFs, what the hell is that?” I wasn’t really up on that at the time
and she was very much into all of this she had had her house
tested and there were a lot of electronic magnetic
frequencies in the house and that we do know has
a correlation with cancer. She tested the house
and it was so fascinating. We were in an old house, 1920s,
we had remodeled it a bunch of times but when she tested it, the EMFs on his side of
the bed were off the charts high, and also in our family room
where we spend a lot of time. Again, that’s just one of
the many factors that caused cancer, but the number on the meter
reader was incredibly high. I can’t stop thinking about that because we didn’t
have cellphones next to our beds at those times. We didn’t have our computers in bed. It wasn’t that kind of…
that many years ago we didn’t do that. His father also had cancer and passed
away when he was two years old. It was skin cancer.
I don’t think those things correlate but I think it was the stress, the diet,
the emotional component, the trauma in his life and potentially it was just
overloaded with the toxins. Since we didn’t have cellphones next to our
beds, how was that electromagnetic frequency… Oh, that’s a really good question because what
I think was happening was when we re-did the house, our wires weren’t, like, they
weren’t put properly together. They weren’t grounded, so in the house… it was an old house and
I think the wires weren’t grounded properly and that’s what causes the EMFs as well,
the electricity that goes through the house. That’s so interesting.
– Yeah, I know. Mold, we have all these things to
worry about, right, with the house. Yeah, so did you then do sort of…
– Yeah. I ended up selling the house a couple years because
it didn’t feel right, but I mean, there are all those things too.
– I mean, we had built the house. We had… there was mold in the house.
It was an old house. There’s all these chemicals
that come off of paint and carpet and furniture these days, so it is a little crazy,
but not to scare anybody because we have lived with all these
stuff and some people are completely fine. Right.
It’s just a matter of understanding… sounds like your risk from starting out life with
a bit of a compromised immune system and then just I guess some odds of those things coming
together that actually create cancer as well. There was a book that I read,
Radical Remission. You’ve heard about…
– I’ve heard of it. Kelly Turner wrote it. She did I think
10 years… did her PhD for the book and she came up with nine modalities. She was
interviewing Stage Four cancer people who healed, not from Western,
from other alternative methods. Seven out of these nine
modalities were emotional and one was food and
one was supplements. I just interviewed Kelly Gores
from the Heal documentary and this book and this woman,
Kelly Turner, was in it. She was talking about these as well. It is literally on my Notes app now. I look at these nine
all the time because, yes, I’m dealing with a bit of
a thyroid thing right now, but in general, I don’t think of
myself as a chronic illness patient, but if I can be doing or working on these
nine things just as part of my human life, then perhaps I can prevent them because
I imagine it kind of works inversely as well. The forgiveness component and
obviously the diet component and herbs and supplements and
things like that, it’s just, it’s wild that they were able to kind of
gather all of that great scientific research and see how much of it is really in the mind.
-Your mind, I know. It’s powerful. It is and it’s kind of exciting because it’s like
as long as you’re willing to do the tough work, you can prevent or reverse
a lot of serious things. That’s my big thing.
You can reverse I feel like almost anything. Yeah.
– If you really want to. Right, and also just knowing, I mean using what
the conventional system gives us to know, okay, I do want to do a bit of
the radiation because I want to get this thing before it gets worse
but I’m going to do all these other therapies so that I’m not going to destroy
my immune system even further because I knew it’s an issue for me ahead
of time with things that had happened. I feel like that’s taking all of the factors
into account, making a calculated decision as like an empowered patient rather than the doctor says this one thing, I’m just
going to do this one thing and not think about any of the other things
that I might be able to. I feel like you’re way
ahead of your time. I was lucky. You know, there was something
inside me that wanted to go that direction. I definitely knew I wanted to live
and I wanted to have a better life and I wanted to feel
better in my body. How, speaking of trauma, do you go from putting your cancer into remission,
then having your husband pass away? I mean, I am newly married. I think
I would just crumble and fall apart. Yeah, so did you have to do
the whole emotional healing all over again? Yes. It took a long time.
It’s still unbelievable. He’s been gone, what’s it,
13 years now, but it’s… he was only 45. He seemed so strong on
the outside and to think that he’s not here with us is still hard and it’s still a trauma. It’s a PTSD
that happens for myself and my girls. With my fiance, when he’s had some health issues
lately, we go right back into that PTSD mode which is hard. I mean, you’re
always going to have it but we have to get some tools to figure out
how to get us out of it, not stay in it. You had better tools because
of what you’ve gone through, so it didn’t send you back into
a chronic disease diagnosis of some kind and then you really made an
amazing transition in your life to actually working in this
field as so many of us have because it’s like once you go through something,
you feel like you can’t keep it to yourself. I know, no.
You got to spread the good news. Yeah, exactly. Tell the story of how you got
to where you are today with your career. After he passed away, I was like,
“Okay, what the heck am I going to do?” because I have these
two girls that are 10 and 7, and I really didn’t want… I wasn’t
thinking of being a nutritionist at all, but I did want to learn more about
how to keep the three of us healthy because I was worried about them, with two parents who had cancer, who knew what was
going to come up the pipeline with the two of them, plus the trauma and
the PTSD they had gone through. I knew that was going to be
a problem on going to their adult life. I went back to school to
study about all these things and I was interested in it for myself because I knew I wanted to move
on with my life and get healthy too. I wasn’t doing so well at that time either from the depression, anxiety,
panic attacks after he passed away. Like, “Yikes, I have to go back
into the world and raise this family,” as well as probably go
back to work and all of that. I went back and studied in
Eastern and Western nutrition, all the different modalities which was…
I loved it. It was so much fun. The Chinese, Ayurvedic and just things
that have been around for centuries. The herbal remedies,
the homeopathic, I mean, it was just so fascinating, way more
fascinating than the Western modalities, the diets and all of that. Who wants to study surgery
when you can study, you know, acupuncture and radians and energy.
Exactly. Yeah, absolutely.
I love the whole energy part. I’m in to all of that,
energy crystals, anything you throw my way. And then a friend of mine brought
Cafe Gratitude down from San Francisco, the vegan restaurant that
popped here about six years ago and she said, “Will you put
a cleanse together for us?” and I knew nothing about cleansing. That was so incredible too because it was a perfect opportunity for me
to get into getting healthier as well because cleansing on a daily
basis is what I believe now is really crucial for all this. I put that program together for her
and I did it for about four and a half years and I did one for M Cafe.
It’s a macrobiotic restaurant here in Los Angeles and I did a little of that for Erawan. They’re all three amazing places
in terms of health and wellness. Erawan now is just incredible. I was there a few days ago. I was just
like, this is like Mecca. It was amazing. It’s Mecca and it’s also like, oh my god,
you go numb because there’s so much there that you don’t even know what
you should be picking or not picking is what’s happening with
the wellness space. It’s overwhelming. Yes. I have a health food store
that’s near me in New York and I didn’t even know I could have so many various
options on a plant-based yogurt for example. I walked into Erawan, I’m like, “What did I get into?” “What do I get?”
– Yeah, exactly. That’s what’s happened. It’s become
a little overkill these days, like where do I go? What do I do?
What diet do I do? All that stuff. That’s how my career started,
was I got into this cleansing role. And then four years ago, people
were saying, “Hey, will you cook for me and deliver food?” I’m not really a chef but
I do love food and I love really healthy food so I found someone to help me
put a cleanse together myself. I have a soup cleanse.
Cleanse is a funny word. I don’t believe in the deprivation
of a juice cleanse or starvation of just drinking water for so many
days or the master or all that stuff. I think that’s really depriving
your system of things. My program is just…
it’s all healthy food, no gluten, no dairy, no sugar, no processed, non-GMO stuff,
but it’s tons of veggies. We don’t eat enough veggies
and we don’t eat enough fiber. I’m trying to get people off of,
not completely off of animal protein because I’m an 80/20 girl, so I can’t survive without
some animal protein, but there are studies, legitimate studies that show animal
protein do increase your risk for cancer. Especially processed, right?
I mean, I know the connection between processed meat and
being carcinogenic and yet we, still many of my most
intelligent friends are just like, they think bacon is the most glorious
thing and kind of celebrate it as do our whole culture does. It is delicious, I get it, but I’m like the kind of
annoying bearer of bad news that’s always like, “This is the only thing that we know for
sure is carcinogenic in the food world. Why is nobody not listening?” and also like cold cuts.
Even turkey cold cuts. That’s the same category
and people are sort of… it’s somehow just not part of health
care as far as what’s recommended and at least avoid this. I’ve never heard that before and I guess you hear that in some official
recommendations here and there, but nobody really seems to adhere to it. It’s just like either you’re a vegan
or you’re eating all of this stuff. I think there’s a nice middle ground which is
what you were talking about, the 80/20 of similar to what I try to follow,
like I’m only going to have meat if I know it’s pasture-raised and I know it’s
grass-fed and hormone-free and all of that and not have too much of that and try to
have smaller portions when I do have it, but I know that there are certain
vitamins and nutrients that for me are, I’ve been told,
I do need that a bit in my life, and even there’s just some fantastic
sheep cheese that once in a while, it’s just going to happen. I don’t want to live
in a world where I can’t have it once in a while. There’s also a sheep yogurt
at Erawan that is to die for. Never do I feel good after
eating the whole container. But I agree, there has
to be some balance and you don’t want to
deprive yourself of certain things. I mean, every once in a while I have to
have a really good burger, you know? No, I’m not a burger girl but once… you’re right, every six months
I’m sort of in a situation where I’m like… You’re craving.
– “That is what I am having.” Yes, and then I’m like,
“So who’s going to split it with me?” looking for the person at the table. Dr. Kristi Funk, she’s a breast
cancer surgeon, she wrote a book, “Breast Cancer Manual”
in June it came out. She did two years’ worth of
research on what increases cancer risk and she is now 100 percent vegan. Yeah. There’s legitimate stuff out there
but we’re not talking about that enough. It does increase your heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, dementia, cancer. I mean, we’re not eating clean
animal products is what’s happening. We’re talking about energy a little bit, these animals, the way they’re killed,
so to speak, they’re traumatized. We sometimes ingest a bit of that energy
and people don’t really even equate to that. Yes, they have antibiotics
and hormones in them, but there could be some
energy in that meat, even though it’s dead that I don’t think… I have never thought about that
but you’re absolutely right, yeah. That’s not so good, so ingesting…
– Taking on their problems in a way. Exactly. I put this program together and I,
just for people to go vegan for five days, they can reset their body.
They can sleep better, lose weight, have better mental clarity. Emotionally they can feel
better, more energized. I’ve watched this happen and it’s such a beautiful thing
and five days is not long. Right. I was just going to… I just did
25 days on the adrenal, thyroid and it was very strict but…
now I could do five days any time. No big deal.
– Yeah. It’s been really fun. It’s four
years I’ve been doing this and I service about 100 people a month. I get to cook for them and deliver
this food for them for five days and it is filled with love
and nourishment. It’s all organic and just,
it’s how I love to eat as well. I don’t think we get enough love
and nourishment in our food either. That’s another thing. I remember interviewing Dana James. Yes, I love her. About her book, the Archetype Diet,
talking about the vibrational frequency of, first of all, different colors
of food, like ROYGBIV and we know the different
colors of different frequency and the same is true
for love and food. When something is made for
you with love and attention, somebody who cares for you
and really puts effort into cooking, that has a very different frequency
when you are consuming that food and even through
the digestive process than something that was on a conveyor
belt by somebody you don’t know who might hate his job and
whatever else that might be going on. That was the first time I’d ever really
thought about the vibrational nature of food and you see that trend now
with the Marie Kondo stuff and just the vibrational nature of
your home and is it filled with love? Do you love the things that you have?
Are they just causing you more stress? Or have you not even
just thought about it? You just have stuff and it’s neither you
love it or you hate it or it’s just there. Taking up space. Exactly. Same thing with food.
– Same thing with food. I know. Like, are you eating this because you
absolutely love it and it’s nourishing to you or you’re just like
shoving something in because then you’re about to go to
a meeting and you’ll eat whatever? Right.
I’ve never… Just to fill your body.
– You begin to think so differently about it. The sad thing is we wait
till something happens. We wait till a trauma event happens
or something health issue comes up and that’s the hardest thing for me
with a lot of clients who come in. They’re having heavy
duty health issues, but before that,
they didn’t even think about it. Now all of a sudden, they have to retrain
themselves and go back to a place, what we’re talking about
and it’s hard as you get older. You become so accustomed to a certain way
of living and you just think you’re invincible. It’s not always the case. Or like you somehow lose perspective on,
I’ve heard, somebody I know who is in their 60s say, “Well, I tried that
diet to lower my high blood pressure but it wasn’t
realistic, so now I’m taking this drug.” I’m like, I guess it’s not worth it to you to
not give up this Cheetos or something? It was so hard for me to understand
that somebody could consciously say, “I don’t want to eat well
so I’d rather take this drug that has all these side effects
and blah, blah, blah.” I don’t know. Society too. We’ve been taught that.
We’ve been taught you got to eat animal protein. We’ve been taught that sugar’s okay,
so to speak, or dairy’s okay, right, just from advertising, marketing and
the drug pharmaceutical company. The food pyramid. I’m not putting pharmaceutical
companies down because I think there’s a time
and place for all that stuff. We’re talking about
the Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism, sometimes you’ve got to go on
meds to get over a certain hump when you don’t feel
good and all that stuff, but it does take some effort to get to the
other side and think holistically and think, “How am I really going to heal the
root cause of what’s going on here?” Right, and not go to the meds necessarily
first without trying anything else. Like, “Oh, I don’t even…
I have to do this.” There’s like four other steps you could’ve
taken first and it might have all worked. Don’t you want to even
give that a shot? No? Okay. What’s interesting is those steps
could be the simple things like, yeah, going back to maybe
eating more real food and taking the sugar, dairy, gluten,
out or watching it and then maybe not drinking
as much coffee as we do, just sleeping better, learning some
modalities just to destress a bit. Things that don’t even
cost a lot of money. This wellness and holistic lifestyle is so expensive
but if you look at the foundations of it, it’s actually something
that is a lot less expensive than any health care
experience that you might have. That’s true.
– And it’s just a cultural misperception, I think. Although organic blueberries
nowadays it’s ridiculous how much it is. A small container maybe is $8 or something
and you look at a hamburger at McDonald’s, but this is artificially low.
This is not the actual cost of that food because if they’ve done all these things
to bring that down with different subsidies and not bringing in the actual
health care cost of living on that diet and all that stuff, and if you were not…
you fed your cattle real grass and how much that would
cost and things like that. That’s what I say to people.
It’s not that this is expensive. This is the real cost of food and this is just made artificially low
and that’s sort of a pay later situation. Absolutely. We don’t think about pay later, do we? We want immediate help,
just give me the help right now and whatever I need to do to eat.
We just don’t think about the future. You wrote a whole book
called “Cancer Hacks”. Young people in their 20s and 30s are starting to see cancer in their lives.
I mean, you actually had cancer but a lot of us are… I’ve been hearing people in their
30s that are getting little things like breast cancer, prostate cancer,
like things that are really… sort of shocked and of course our parents
are getting them more in droves and having aunts and uncles
and things like that. I think overall, there’s nothing
more interesting on the health side to people of every generation
that’s alive right now than understanding how we can
prevent cancer and reverse cancer. I feel like you just wrote a whole book about that,
so share a couple of things that you learned. I think that we need to tap into, did we have any
traumas growing up and are we living with some PTSD? The first seven years of your life,
your subconscious is fully downloaded. That’s a research fact. If you had
anything happen in those first seven years, you definitely carry that with you. We operate 98 percent out
of our subconscious. We’re barely conscious.
Maybe we’re five percent conscious. We have these messages that we
keep telling ourselves and our body that we’re scared or this happened.
We don’t want this to happen again. We’re on hyper alert.
That is a huge thing. I mean, I don’t want to say
everybody needs to go into therapy but maybe tap into what is working,
what isn’t working in your life and do you feel satisfied and happy is a little bit
overused word, but content and grateful and just are you
living your passion and purpose. You were talking about that. It’s a little
overused too these days in the health world. But just like, are you really
where you need to be? Because having that
feeling of calmness and gratefulness and feeling like,
wow, I do really love my life. Yeah, there are things that I always
want to change, but that is huge. I mean, in the whole cancer health
issue world, we don’t have that. That just permeates through to getting us into a place where we
make the wrong decisions for food. We don’t sleep. We’re stressed.
We don’t exercise enough. We choose bad relationships. I guess maybe going back to
the place of, “Do I love myself?” because I’m 58, so I didn’t really
start loving myself until two years ago. I cannot believe that, but go ahead.
– I can’t believe I just said that number. I just really started tapping into love for myself
two years ago and my whole world changed, absolutely changed. Was there anything in particular you used
to get there, like a book or something? I think it was the Hashimoto’s
we talked about, because after the cancer I got hypothyroidism
because they radiated my thyroid. I had hypothyroidism and
then I had my first daughter, which was traumatic, and I got Hashimoto’s,
so I dealt with that for 21 years. On meds, trying to figure out…
I had anxiety, depression, celiac, all these different things. Those health
issues that I talked about earlier in my life, I still kind of had them
later in my life too. I did get through all of them but I realized I really wanted to get on
the road to healing this Hashimoto’s and get to a place
where I was feeling great. I was feeling good but
I didn’t know what great meant. That word would not
come out of my mouth, so basically that’s when
I met the medical medium and I did a protocol of his and I started feeling
great and that’s probably a whole other segment. Also, things started coming up emotionally
for me when I got to that great place and I realized that there was a big
component of I’m very much a perfectionist. I’m so used to beating up on myself. Again, that sort of method of,
like I talked about, I was younger, like I’m not good enough. When I got into the whole wellness
world and things were going really well, it wasn’t enough even.
It was like, “Oh no, I got to do better. I got to reach more people. I have to do this and that,”
and it just, it burned me out and I was like, “Wow, that’s interesting. I feel great,”
but that great only takes you so far. That’s so interesting that you said that
even when you were having success, you felt, “No, I have to go further,”
and you’re still beating yourself up because I think a lot of us feel there’s
this, “Oh, well if I could just get there,” but really, it’s just all inside you whether or not
when you get there you’ll be satisfied and happy or… and be able to say,
“Great job!” and take a break and feel just good about it or continue the same sort
of negative self-talk and just push yourself. I mean, it’s always
good to push yourself. There has to be some balance and I think
that’s with our young people today too. You’re talking about the younger generation.
I mean, they’re pushing themselves harder, more than I think we did. They don’t give themselves that time to just chill out and have any
type of boredom in their life because the phone, the Netflix
which is great, I mean, the computer, there’s no time, downtime, to just chill and figure out
what I really want in my life? What do I personally want? And did I feel any joy today?
– Yes. That took me by surprise. Somebody said
that to me a few days ago and it was just, of course it was a normal Tuesday.
January in New York, it’s freezing. I’m like, “Who is feeling
joy today? Nobody.” But it just kind of made me realize,
I have planned nothing today that actually would make me
really smile. It’s all just grinding and what if tomorrow is
the last day of my life? I got to find a way to do
that even just a little bit, whether it’s dancing in your living
room or something silly like that. You’re so right. That’s it.
I mean, in a nutshell. I mean, we don’t do that enough. We don’t spend
time with our friends and I love the blue zone, the blue zones, and it’s about connection and downtime and spending time with the
loved ones, people who really do bring you up and not the ones that don’t.
That’s stressful. Eating real food and enjoying your life
and laughing and the connection is huge. I love getting really actionable
towards the end of my interviews on… just because I think people come to my platform
who are trying to figure out a health issue, whether they know they’re just not feeling
great but they don’t have a diagnosis or they’ve just gotten one and
they’re trying to figure out, “Can I do some kind of protocol”
or “What could I try before I have to go to another doctor?”
or something like that, or while I’m seeing doctors. You mentioned, obviously you reversed
cancer, but also you reversed Hashimoto’s. To me, you’re like
just a perfect student and just a handful of things that you
think were really the most impactful that would be good places to start.
Obviously self-love is number one, which is also the hardest and just giving yourself a break.
We’re all working on this but it’s the most important thing. I know
this from so many people now including you, and then diet and really nourishing yourself
it seems like is the second component. Is there something specific about soup?
Because I know that’s your cleanse. Soup is really about… I am telling
everybody to up their veggie count. Nine or 10 cups of veggies a day. That is not what the RDA recommends, but we just don’t get enough.
That’s our lifeline. That’s where the anti-oxidants, the phytochemicals and
the vitamins and the minerals are. I mean, that’s our lifeline and
we’re not eating enough veggies. Soup to me is like getting
nutrients at a cellular level. I love pureed soups
because that’s so easy. Your digestive system doesn’t
have to work too hard. Even the chunkier ones, sometimes your digestive system doesn’t
have to work that hard with those either, but you are digesting and absorbing
those nutrients at a cellular level. That is huge. That’s why
I got into the whole soup thing. When I was diagnosed with
cancer and I started juicing, that’s another one of my things
that I preach about all the time. I’m a huge juicer and
I juice greens almost every day. I sometimes just do really simple things,
like celery, cucumber, lemon, ginger, romaine. It’s really refreshing and simple and if you’re
not a big greens person and love drinking that, that is the perfect thing.
Tons of nutrients. It’s not only a multi-vitamin,
but it’s a mineral and it’s a blood tonic.
It cleanses your blood. It’s huge and it also helps the liver.
It helps the intestines. The different veggies have different
detoxifying systems of the organs. I mean… and it’s hydrating. It’s a beautiful thing to up
the ante with those veggies. Again, you can definitely get your cups of
veggies in with the soup and with the juice. I would say, I mean, there’s a big
thing right now with the celery juice. Everybody’s juicing celery.
– I’m hearing about it way too much. I know. It’s getting a little overkill. I mean, I’ve had… I mean, it’s working on me. I’m about
to go home and try this celery juice. Yeah. No, it does. There is some
beautiful things about celery juice but there’s also some beautiful things
about just greens in general, and juicing. I mean, I don’t put
any fruit in my juices. That’s too much sugar. Apple, pear, it’s way too much
sugar going into the bloodstream and it gives you like an insulin rush. We don’t
need that because we eat enough sugar. I eat fruit. Okay, I was going to ask you that.
– I just love fruit. It’s anti-aging and I know a lot of people
these days aren’t eating enough fruit because of the sugar or potential candida,
yeast and all those things, but fruit is the fountain of youth and these veggies are
really just crucial and fiber. We don’t eat enough fiber. That was my maybe stupid
question about juicing. I thought maybe because you’re sort
of losing some of the fiber by juicing it, so I was always of the mindset
that you should just try to eat those veggies or puree them in a more like
a smoothie type of thing to not lose the fiber, but is that not true? No, that’s absolutely true too. You can do that and that’s why smoothies
are good and that’s why the soups are good because you still have the fiber
intact and there’s this parade. I like the idea of the liquid nutrients
into the cells as an addition. It’s not a meal replacement.
It’s my multi, basically. So you’re taking all of your micronutrients
from this juice rather than from a supplement. Rather than from a supplement,
right, and then fiber. I add a lot of fiber to my diet. We usually get 15 grams.
We need 25 grams. We need the fiber to flush us out of all the toxins
that we’re talking about that are in the system. I mean, flax and chia and all those
wonderful things, plus the complex carbs, the legumes, which I know right now
there’s controversy on legumes and beans from Dr. Gundry’s book. Yes. I saw him speak and felt very nervous because I also love,
as you mentioned, the blue zones and nuts and beans are… I mean,
nuts are not a legume, but beans are and that is like the foundation of
a lot of these blue zone diets and I was very confused and
I think that’s why it’s really important, especially with the wellness scene
to not be dogmatic, right? Be dogmatic about vegetables. I think
everybody would agree with you on that, but with everything else, it’s really about if you’re reversing
a chronic health issue, not you’re playing into also your
ethnicity, your genes, your lifestyle. There’s all these different things
where maybe you can handle some really delicious sheep or
cow dairy here and there and others where like that is an
attack on your immune system and you shouldn’t go anywhere near that
and those two things are really different. Pay attention to what works for you when
you eat it, because your body tells you, “I didn’t do so well with that.” You have maybe bloating
or constipation or all those things and you
just don’t feel energized. I mean, we need to pay attention to the foods
that work for us and what don’t work for us because healthy things
do work and don’t work. Absolutely. I tell my husband, when he needs
a nap after he eats, this is not a good sign. He’s like, “Oh no, those are unrelated.”
I’m like, “No, they’re not.” Really pay attention.
If you’re tired, you should be energized by food as
you’re saying, not depleted by it. It means that your body was
clearly like, “No thanks!” “That wasn’t working,” or
“It was too much.” Maybe it was overload. I would say,
really watch the animal protein. I think it’s hard for our body to
break down that saturated fat. It’s so concentrated and we’re not just eating… like this is
four ounces, the palm of your hand. That’s so little. We’re eating like six ounces
minimum, six ounces to seven ounces per meal. That is basically 30 grams of protein. If you’re eating three times of that, you’re eating 90, 100 grams of protein. That’s too much. Your body can only break
down so much protein per hour, per day. That just sits in your tissues
and does turn into fat and it’s not good. Animal protein isn’t bad.
It’s just that we’re overdoing it too. Are you including fish in that? Yup.
– It’s all of that. It’s fish, chicken, turkey,
red meat, everything. And I know, I love fish.
They all have valuable nutrients. Eggs.
– Eggs. We just eat too much. It’s about just kind of watching,
not overdoing these things. Learning about plants again,
making that the foundation. It sounds like it’s a great
way to reverse cancer, Hashimoto’s and you’ve
done amazing things. Working at it.
Still it’s a work in progress. The last thing that
I’d like to do is ask how you… so many different wellness
things and you can get out of bed in an hour later you’re still
doing your morning routine these days, right. It’s ridiculous. I think someone
should make a spoof on that because it’s so silly how much we have
to do before we can start our day now. That’s a good idea. I think about that as I’m rolling
my eyes through my process. Same here. But we say get WellBe is our
name and so we think it kind of brings an action to good health
doesn’t just happen to you, right. It’s about the 100 choices that you make
a day which are truly your health care the end. Would you tell us how, a couple of
absolutely can’t miss things that you do every single day now that you feel
like are a foundation for prevention of diseases coming back that you say,
“I get WellBe by,” whatever it is because that’s something I feel like
our audience loves to hear about. Well, I get WellBe by… I make sure that I sleep. I get eight to sometimes
nine hours of sleep. I mean, that sounds like a lot,
I know, but sleep is the foundation of really getting you past any health
issues or you not getting health issues. I mean, that is so crucial. I would say the juicing, I mean,
I’m a little obsessed with that because I feel like it’s just propelled me into
a whole different atmosphere with my health. I mean, it’s anti-aging and it
gives me the energy that I need to get everything done for the day. Those two things are a must of,
god, there’s so many. And I would say my emotional
well-being is really taking stock in how much I do appreciate myself. It’s a hard thing to say and
I still have to work on it. I’ll probably have to work
on it for the rest of my life, but to be grateful for who I am and what I’ve done in my life,
and even good and bad, everything that’s come
my way, all the hardships. Yeah. I love that. We talk a lot about gratitude
exercises nowadays, right, and the scientific power of gratitude but
never really have I thought about saying… when I say those exercises in the morning,
just what I’m grateful for, saying like, “And I’m grateful for me!” It should be a no-brainer
and yet I don’t do that. I know. It’s true. It’s amazing
what we’ve kind of let slide, but it is a work in progress, right. We all get
there when we’re supposed to get there. Exactly. I love that.
Elissa, thank you so much for sitting down with me to share
all these great information. Your story is so inspiring, incredible and I know a lot of people, whether
they’ve had cancer, going through cancer, Hashimoto’s or anything
else, it’s really applicable to everything you
might be going through, learn from what you’ve done, hopefully
pick up your book also, Cancer Hacks, if that’s something they’re really curious about.
I think it’s totally fascinating. I sure will. Thank you for having me.
– Absolutely. Thank you everyone for joining us.