How to Compost in Small Spaces with Organic Bokashi Composting

How to Compost in Small Spaces with Organic Bokashi Composting

September 16, 2019 24 By Ewald Bahringer


Hi I’m Trish an organic gardener I grow
organically. For a healthy and safe food supply, for a
clean and sustainable environment, for an enjoyable and rewarding
experience. Have you always wanted to compost but have been afraid of brown green ratios or nervous about
turning your compost pile? Or maybe you’re in an urban area. We have a method of composting that’s
probably perfect for you. The Bokashi method is a Japanese
technique used with anaerobic fermentation.
Traditional composting is an aerobic process, meaning it needs
oxygen. That’s why you need to turn the pile.
Fermentation is an anaerobic process meaning to keep the
air away therefore no pile turning and the
secret to this is EM or effective microorganisms. This mix of lactic acid, yeast and phototrophic bacteria was perfected
by doctor Teruo Higa, a professor of
Horticulture at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa. This Bokashi composting kit has
everything you need to start composting. It contains an airtight bucket with a
spout for draining of the Bokashi tea and a bag of the Bokashi starter.
You can order single bags of the starter as well. To start just add a layer of about three
inches a food scraps to the bucket. Make sure and chop up any large pieces
before adding. with Bokashi composting you can even add meat, cheese and small bones. Continue layering and adding the starter. Sprinkle the top layer with starter and
stir to coat the food. Be generous with the starter if you’re
composting tough foods like meat, bones and coffee grounds.
Normally you would use a third of a bag for each full bucket. Place a plate or some other flat object on top to make
sure that air doesn’t get to the fermenting scraps. Then put the lid on tightly. Make sure it’s sealed. Every few days open the spout and drain off the Rich
Bokashi tea. Dilute this at a rate of 1 tablespoon to
one gallon of water and use it on your house plants and in the garden. Repeat this process
until your bucket is full and then set it aside for about two
weeks to further ferment. I like having two buckets going at one
time so that I don’t have to stop and wait. Don’t add water because excessive liquid can make the mix rot. Also you want to keep your bucket out of the sun. When the bucket is ready the food won’t really look that
different but it will have a sweet and sour pickle
aroma and maybe some white growth on the top. These are all good signs. If it smells foul, something went wrong and you’re gonna have to either add more starter or throw it out and start all over. This one smells good. After the two weeks did a 12-inch trench. Drain off the tea, then bury the Bokashi. If you live in a rural area you might
have to bury it a little bit deeper. wash the bucket
thoroughly and then you’re ready to repeat the
process. After two weeks the Bokashi will be broken down even
farther and then you can plant whatever plants you’d like right on top. If you growing in containers you can use
your Bokashi by filling a container a third of the
way with potting soil. Fill it another third with Bokashi. Mix them together thoroughly and top
with the final third potting soil. Cover with plastic to encourage and
anaerobic environment. Wait two weeks and then plant. You can
also add your Bokashi to your regular aerobic compost pile. For more information check out the book
“Bokashi Composting” and grow organic for life.