How to Prepare Nutritious Porridge | 5 Methods

How to Prepare Nutritious Porridge | 5 Methods

October 5, 2019 3 By Ewald Bahringer


Hi! Here’s the must-have intro — I am Nele,
founder of Nutriplanet and on my blog and YouTube channel you will find
gluten-free whole food plant-based recipes, practical tips for those
transitioning to plant-based lifestyle, free guide to Candida overgrowth and
meal plans for both whole food plant-based and vegan Candida diet. Welcome to
the second porridge video of the series of four! In the first video I guided you
through the 7 steps to make healthy balanced porridge.
We covered selecting the grains and quantities, choosing liquids and
preparation methods, adding healthy fats, spices and boosters; veggies, fruits and
berries, and finally toppings. In today’s video I’ll show you step by step how to
make the best out of each preparation method. We’ll cover simply soaking, just
cooking, soaking and blending, soaking and cooking, and finally soaking, blending and
cooking. The next video will be all about low carb porridges and the last one
introduces you to savoury porridges. So let’s get on with it! Simply soak.
Suitable grains are raw buckwheat and the oat family: oatmeal, which is made by
using grooved rolls to break up the oats to produce different grades of oatmeal
from coarse to medium or fine. Then jumbo rolled oats — whole oats that have
been softened with steam and then flattened between rollers to make flakes,
and finally rolled oats that are steel cut oats that have been softened with
steam and then rolled to produce flakes. So let’s make overnight oats! Pour
desired amount of rolled oats into a bowl, container or jar. I used 50 grams
here. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground flax or chia or a combo both. Give it a
stir. Next go in desired spices and boosters. You can learn all about those
from the previous video how to make balanced porridge! I used cinnamon,
cardamom, cloves, turmeric and ginger here. Again, mix it up really well. Now add water and plant-based milk or only one. Give it a
good stir and keep adding liquid until the consistency is a bit runnier than
you’d like the finished porridge to be. The amount depends on your own preferences
as well as used add-ins. For example ground chia seeds absorb much more
liquid than flax. Don’t add any salt at this stage as salt inhibits liquid
absorption. When you’re ok with the consistency, cover the jar, bowl or
container with lid and keep it in fridge overnight or longer. When you take it out,
give it another stir to see whether you need to add more water or milk. This is
also the moment for final touches, such as sprinkling some Himalayan salt or
boosting it with some more spices. Just have a taste and adjust accordingly. And
now you can let your imagination go wild! I poured some of homemade plum jam in
the bottom of a jar then added the overnight oats and topped it off with
red currants, cacao nibs and pumpkin seeds. Go and watch the previous video
for detailed overview about spices, boosters, sweeteners, fruits, berries, veggies
and toppings. Simply cooking. Let’s move on to the next method. t The most common way to make porridge is simply cooking. You can do that with porridge flakes of any
kind, steel-cut oats, rolled oats, oatmeal.
Simply follow the instructions on the package. Semolina and flours. Semolina is
basically a coarse grind of a grain or corn. I use the following trick to make
really smooth flour porridges — I take the flour, put it in the glass and gradually
start pouring water while whisking until I get homogeneous batter and then I pour
this into boiling water while whisking. And finally pre-roasted buckwheat that
is used to make kasha. I now show you step-by-step, how I make porridge with a
combo of rolled oats and oat bran. I used 30 grams of both rolled oats and oat
bran. Added 200 grams of water and gave it a stir. I let it sit for 5 minutes to let the oats absorb some water. Then brought to boil and whisked every now and then. When it became quite thick I poured in 1/2 cup soy milk, brought to
boil again and cooked for a few more minutes. The overall cooking time was
about 5 minutes. Before adding anything else I let it sit covered for a few
minutes. Next I mixed in spices and boosters. I
craved for chocolaty porridge and therefore I threw in one tablespoon of
each cacao powder, mesquite and carob. Additionally, one teaspoon of barley
grass powder, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, quarter tsp of ginger, cardamom and
turmeric, and finally a pinch of cloves. Next up were healthy fats. I went for
1 tablespoon of ground flax and 1 tablespoon of chia seeds. You may use
only one. I also added as much oat milk as necessary for desired consistency.
Okay, now that the porridge is in the bowl, we
can start with toppings. The most of citrus fruits’ power is in the zest. So I
decided to add a bit of homemade orange peel powder that goes so well with
chocolaty flavour. I’ll link to my video on how to make citrus peel powder at
home in the description below! Then I thawed some cranberries, wild
blueberries and blackberries. The darker the berries the more antioxidant bang
you get! You may also throw frozen berries straight onto your porridge or mix them
in. I just prefer them thawed. Some more healthy fats, namely soaked and
dehydrated sunflower seeds and a small handful of goji berries. Did you know
that goji berries have the highest concentration of melatonin (hormone that
regulates the sleep/wake cycle)? And the third highest antioxidant capacity of
common dried fruits? Yay for gojis! Ok, this porridge is
super loaded now! So let’s dig in! You can flavour your porridge with anything you
like — get detailed info from my previous video! Soak and blend. Soak and blend method
basically applies to raw buckwheat only and it’s my favourite method in summer as
its nutritious and hearty as well as cold and refreshing.
Theoretically you could blend your soaked overnight oats as well, if you
want to porridge to be extra creamy. Now let me walk you through the making of
raw buckwheat porridge. Start by soaking buckwheat groats for at least four hours,
better six to eight. I used 100 grams. Then rinse them well as they get quite
slimy. You could make an extra effort and sprout the buckwheat before blending
giving the nutritional value an additional boost and lowering glycemic
load. Transfer into a blender or beaker, add any frozen or fresh berries. I went
for wild blueberries. A small banana cut into chunks, about two tablespoons
coconut milk (that’s optional), and then some water or plant milk for desired
consistency. Try to add as little as possible in the beginning not to make it
too runny. And then it’s down to blending! I must admit I accidentally added a bit
too much of water, but fixed it by blending in some psyllium husks. Coconut
flour would have been an excellent option as well. You can make this
porridge in bigger batches and store in fridge for easy breakfasts, snacks or
dessert. Garnish with some extra berries or fruits (fresh or frozen), and nuts and
seeds. My 9-year-old basically inhaled those two jars! Soak and cook. You can
tick off most grains here: raw buckwheat, amaranth, millet, kamut, barley, oat, whole grain
rice and various types of oats — steel-cut oats, oatmeal. Quinoa. I’ll show
you step by step how I make amaranth oat bran porridge using soak and cook method.
First soak amaranth overnight. Yes, this is millet, but you get the point!
The easiest way to rinse amaranth is to use a sieve. You can’t use the lid trick here
as amaranth berries are so tiny and would simply slip through straight down
the sink. I used 30 grams of amaranth and put it to boil with 150 grams of water. I let them cook covered for 5 minutes
and then added 30 grams of oat bran. Make sure to whisk well to avoid any bran
chunks. Next I poured in 1/2 cup soy milk and give it a good stir. I let it
simmer covered for another 5 minutes whisking the porridge every now and then
as soon as it started sticking to the bottom of the pot. When the porridge was
done, I let it sit covered for a few minutes before mixing in 2 tablespoons
of ground flax seeds, 1/2 tablespoon mesquite powder, 1 TSP barley grass
powder, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and turmeric, quarter teaspoon of each ginger,
cardamom and agar agar, and finally 1/8 teaspoon of cloves and Himalayan salt.
I added oat milk to compensate all those dry ingredients and ended up using 150
grams. This may vary though. And now let’s top it! Here are some thawed wild
blueberries and blackberries. Let’s pour those on. Then a tablespoon of soaked and
dehydrated pumpkin seeds and finally frozen raspberries. Again you don’t have
to use the same spices and boosters — use your imagination!
However I’d recommend adding some. Learn the reasons from my previous video 7
steps to balanced porridge. Soak, blend cook. And we are at the final method that
is most probably unknown to many of you. I first tried blended batters for
pancakes, breads and cakes and then thought why not make porridge as well. I
recommend this method to those who enjoy porridges made of flour for their
creaminess. With my method you get as good result, but with a much healthier
porridge. It’s because soaking enhances mineral absorption and makes the grains
overall easier to digest. The grains you can use for soak, blend and cook method
include raw buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth, millet, whole-grain rice, steel-cut oats.
Oat berry and barley groat porridges will not be as creamy, but a bit
chunky as oats and barley are harder than other grains. As amaranth berries are
already so tiny you won’t get a much creamier result, but you can use it
anyway for this method. Now I’ll show you how to make millet and oat bran porridge
using soak, blend and cook method. First I soaked 30 grams of millet overnight or at
least for a few hours. Then I blend them with a bit less than 200 grams of water.
You may also use a combo of water and plant milk.
Notice how milky it looks? If you drained the liquid, you’d get millet milk! Next I
transfer the mixture into my cooking pot. It’s important to give it a stir before
pouring as millet is heavy and sinks to the bottom. Now I bring it to a boil
stirring constantly as the fine millet sticks very quickly to the bottom of
the pot. And then add 30 grams of oat bran. I cook it for 5 minutes whisking
almost constantly. It’s so so silky and creamy! When the porridge is done I let
it sit covered for a few minutes and then whisk in the spices and salt. I use
cinnamon, cardamom and ginger. The key to fluffy porridge is whisking
really vigorously! Then I boost it up with two tablespoons of ground flax seeds and
quarter teaspoon of agar agar. At this point I also add some plant milk as the
porridge is getting quite thick. By the way, agar agar is here for iodine only, it
doesn’t have any other purpose. Add as much plant milk as necessary for desired
consistency. I personally don’t like very thick sticky porridges. My trick to cool
the porridge down quicker is to pour it into my bowl from really high. You must
be careful though not to miss the target! Now look at this creaminess! Let’s add
1/2 a small bowl of wild blueberries. I love the juice I get when thawing the
berries! I also sprinkle on some healthy fats, pumpkin seeds that have been soaked
and dehydrated to boost mineral absorption and make them more easily
digestible. Here you have another nutritious
porridge to enjoy! Now I’d like to know whether you knew about all those methods!
How many of those have you used to make porridge? And which is your favourite? Let
me know in the comment section! As repetition is the mother of learning,
let’s go over the five methods once more! First, simply soaking applies to raw
buckwheat and various oats. Secondly, simply cooking is great for the grains
that don’t necessarily require pre-soaking such as rolled oats, oatmeal,
raw buckwheat or any porridge flakes, semolina and flours. Thirdly, soaking and
blending suits the grains that don’t need to be cooked such as raw buckwheat
and rolled oats. Next, soaking and cooking is a great option for most grains as
soaking in hands is mineral absorption and makes the grains easier to digest.
And finally soaking, blending and cooking is such a treat for those craving for
those extra creamy porridges, but wishing to go for less refined ingredients (that
flowers can be). So here you have it! Stay tuned for the last two videos in this
series — how to make low carb porridges and the wonderful world of savoury porridges! Now
I really look forward to your comments! You can’t imagine how much I appreciate
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