Is Peanut Butter Good for You?

Is Peanut Butter Good for You?

September 13, 2019 87 By Ewald Bahringer


“Is Peanut Butter Good for You?” It was another nutty year in nutrition— most of which we already knew. Walnuts lower our cholesterol— been there; done that. This was a little surprising. The scientific record
has been crystal clear that eating nuts does not make you fat, but the Harvard Nurses’ study just found that eating nuts may actually
help you lose weight. How? Nuts may increase our resting energy
expenditure by as much as 11%. Meaning those who eat
nuts burn more calories just sitting, sleeping, breathing. If there were some
pill that could do that, it would be making some drug
company billions of dollars! Nuts were also shown this year
to suppress cancer growth, and may also decrease
inflammatory markers. You eat butter; inflammation goes up. You slug down a quarter cup of olive oil? Nothing happens— other than you taking in about a quarter
day’s worth of mostly empty calories. And three handfuls of walnuts
significantly decreased inflammation. Same thing with almonds: three handfuls a day significantly reducing inflammation
throughout the body, and three daily handfuls of pistachios significantly improving the
function of our arteries. As one headline put it: a “Handful of pistachios
could destroy cholesterol.” We know that nuts are good for us. But what about peanut butter? Peanuts aren’t actually real nuts; they’re legumes. Peanut butter:
harmful, harmless, or outright helpful? And the answer is:
helpful. Last year, a new Harvard study found
that women at high risk for heart disease eating peanut butter every day had only about half the risk
of suffering a heart attack compared to women who
stayed away from the stuff. So even nuts that aren’t
even nuts are good for you. The only caveat is to “Watch
out for nuts in your travels.” An unusual case of drug-facilitated
robbery reported last year in the Journal of Travel Medicine. The perpetrator employed a highly
unusual and very creative method, where he cut hazelnuts in half, carved them so that he could
implant his choice of drug— in this case a valium-
like drug called Klonopin— and then glued them back together. To overcome the unpleasant
taste of the drugged hazelnuts, he mixed them with dried raisins. He then offered this mixture to fellow passengers who sat
next to him during the trip. How generous these locals are! When the traveler was unconscious,
he stole everything they had. But other than that, nuts are good for us.