Jill Jennings: Behold Brussels Sprouts

Jill Jennings: Behold Brussels Sprouts

October 8, 2019 0 By Ewald Bahringer


I always encourage you, anything you taste in
here, if you think, you know I like the idea of this, I
like, I like basically I love the ingredients but I’m not crazy about
mushrooms or I’m not crazy about um peppers
whenever it is in there. But you like the recipe overall and it’s affordable
to you, it works for your weight loss efforts, etc.,
etc. Just make it yours when you go home. Don’t add
the mushrooms, or if, if when you taste it you
think, it just could use a little more salt. Remember, I’m trying to stay in that middle place
when I salt things here. Because some people
are very, very sensitive to salt. And it’s, it’s critical that they, that they keep it on
the, on the lower side. Some, some people are
very accustomed, at this point in time, to very heavily salted foods and you’re trying to
get away from that. So remember, that, you know, I’m trying to stay
right, somewhere in the middle that would be appropriate for most everybody. But if you’re
somebody who is gradually trying to change the
amount of salt, to, to to reduce the amount of salt, and I’m just using
that as an example here anything, weather it’s fat or salt, or trying to cut
back on you know, your meats, red meat, umm.,
ahhh. Do it slowly. Just like you want to do your weight
loss to be gradual. Do your, you know, do your taste buds a favor and
do it gradually so you don’t feel like you’re going
from heavy salted foods, to no salt. Because nothing’s gonna to taste to you. Just
take it bit by bit. So, if you’re at this end of the spectrum and
you’re use to heady salts and you taste something in here. Remember
that it’s in the middle and you might wanna just
add a little extra pinch for now, so that you will try that dish again. Because it’s gonna
work for you. Remember, that I always choose
dishes that, that will, will support weight loss. So, I just, I just wanted to suggest that and
remember and that’s the fun about recipes any
recipe. I make it here, it’s mine. It can come from somebody else, but then I
make it mine. And then as soon as you make it you can, you can either do it exactly how I did it.
Because that’s how would you like it or just
change one thing change four things and make it yours and every time you do it, it
becomes more and more yours. Now, make it work so that you want to eat it. Umm, alright, so back to brussel sprouts. You’ll see there’s two recipes on there, one is a
cooked, one is cooked and one is raw. I decided to do the raw one, I’ll talk about the
cooked a litttle bit um, but I wanted to give it to you because it
looks, it, it look fantastic, doesn’t it? (Audience:
Is that something like cabbage?) Yes, yes. So, so, brussels sprouts, who, who
ever cooks with brussels sprouts? (Audience
talks among themselves.) Anybody? Okay, you cook, okay you cook ’em.
Have you ever eaten ’em raw? (Audience:
What?) OK, it’s very, well think about this. What other food you eat that kind of tastes like
Brussels sprouts, it’s actually And looks like brussels sprouts. Right. Looks like Brussels sprouts. (Audience:
Cabbage.) Cabbage. And how do you eat
cabbage very often? (Auidence: Raw.) Raw, in a, in a slaw. So this is basically gonna to
be like a slaw. With the addition of dried
cranberries. There’s going to be a little sweetness, right?
And, and maybe there’s a little bitterness to the, to the brussels sprouts, maybe not. Often times,
when you cook brussels sprouts. I think a lot of
people don’t like brussels sprouts because they are so often overcooked. And as soon as
you over cook ’em, that’s when the kitchen smells, right? That’s
when, like sulfury and kind of, you know that
smell. Right? Ahh, that comes from over cooking and they also
become mushy and they can become bitter. So, the key is to minimizing the amount of time
that they’re in contact with heat. Which also does what? The less heat you put,
and I’m not, I’m not saying heat is bad, but When you cook a vegetable, what’s one of the
goals with heat? When you think about, not over cooking, for, not,
not only for taste but what else? What else
changes if you really over…(Audience: Inaudible.) Yeah, yeah, you can lose a lot of the nutrients, so
a lot, losing a lot of the goodness for your body. So that’s true for brussels sprouts as well.
Umm, so you want to try to over, you want to avoid over cooking for a number of
reasons. And that’s true for most things. Umm, so back to, to, to the slaw, the raw, umm. The sweetness of the dried cranberries, the
nuttiness of the toasted nuts, the walnuts, right.
I’ll toast them right there. Chickpeas. Think about brussels sprouts and what other
foods remind you of brussels sprouts. (Audience
shouts various answers.) Cabbage. What else reminds you of cabbage?
(Audience shouts various answers.) Cauliflower. What else? So go from each one
that you mentioned and then think of another one
that reminds you. (Audience shouts answers.) Broccoli, kale, ummm. (Audience: Inaudible.) Not lettuce, but horseradish. Isn’t that an odd
one to, to, to belong in there? I wrote a bunch of
them down. Mustard greens. Ummm, remember last week, I cooked some
bok choy? Bok choy is in there. (Audience: Is
that what you cooked last time?) I did, yeah, bok choy and all of them are high in
fiber. Well, most vegetables are high in fiber, but
they’re specially high in fiber. Very, very high in Vitamin A. Very, very high in
Vitamin C. So they’re good, there’s a lot of goodness in them. And most of them have
some protein in ’em as well. So that’s umm… that’s a good quality. So they, they, it’s just a,
anythime you want to you know, think, don’t.
Think about those cruciferous vegetables. As, as something to increase your intake of.
Collard greens belong in that family, yeah. Before I put together this salad. I do want to look,
if you will, look at the hot recipe. The zesty Brussels sprouts and collard greens
saute. So back to the idea that Brussels sprouts are
best when they’re not overcooked. So keep an eye on them when you’re, when
you’re cooking them. And one, one way of
preparing one easy way of preparing them, if you own one
at all these other ingredients, is to cut off the end. Right, but first, first, take the yellowing leaves off.
If you see a bag of, of Brussels sprouts that have a lot and yellow on them or a lot of big
puffy leaves or they’re not compact, they’re not
hard. You wanna go, pass them up and look for
something else. (Audience: Okay.) So you want it to look like that. Bright, bright
green, compact, no yellow. There were a couple
of yellowing leaves Michaela pulled them all off and cleaned them up. So you want to rinse ’em,
pull those off and then you can cut the stem off, like that and then cut in half and
then cut in quarters. And then you can just put ’em in a steamer
basket and steam ’em for like 6 minutes, or you can
even just simmer them in a little bit of water. drain them and then I think in, in, in, the best way to prepare ’em, two
best ways, is to then drizzle little bit of olive oil, a
little bit of lemon, or a little bit of lemon, lemon you know, grated
lemon rind, zest and salt pepper. They need, know they’re definitely gonna want
some salt, a little bit. That’s a really simple, nice
way to make ’em. Or , you could roast ’em. If you got your oven on
and you’ve got something else cookin’. cut ’em up in that same way. Cut the stem,
quarter of them, and then, drizzle them with the olive oil, salt,
pepper, and toss ’em. Lay ’em flat out on a
cookie sheet and roast ’em for what, 400 for maybe 15 minutes, maybe,
maybe 15. I would check ’em at 10 because the
quartered. And then when they come out, you could put a
little bit of parmesan cheese on them, if you had
a little bit of grated cheese or back to a lemon that’s a nice time to then squeeze of fresh lemon
and serve ’em. So their nice, the key being, don’t leave ’em in the
oven to long and don’t leave and steaming too
long and the way you can’t estimate they are and don’t leave ’em steaming too long. And the
way you can test ’em, if they’re ready when they’re in a steamer basket, is to just take
either a toothpick or very, you know a knife, or a
fork tong or something. And if it just goes in with no effort, it just goes
(makes a whistle sound). They’re done. Yeah,
you want avoid getting to that mushy place. Okay. Is there anything else about the, the
cooking that I wanted to mention to you. Before,
and before I get to the salad. What do you notice about the nutrition facts for
both of these recipes. Just look through and
look through some of those numbers. A couple of things really stand out to me that I just wanna bring to your attention. (Audience: We can’t hear you.) What do you, so
take a look at the nutrition label for both recipes.
What do you notice? They’re good things. What do you think about the calories?
(Audience: It’s more calories in the salad than it
is in the INAUDIBLE WORD.) Not necessarily that there’s in one than in the
other. But just how low the calories are per
serving. Right? So that’s one of the benefits, of course, of
vegetables right? Low in calories, okay. What about what about, so you’ve got the total fat. One is 9
grams the other is eleven. What about the
saturated fat? (Audience responds). One gram. Right, so it’s the good fat, is in both.
So every time you’re looking at a label weather is
for brussels sprouts recipes or a, a, you know, a pasta sauce or whenever it is
you’re looking at. When you see that, when,
when you compare the total fat with the, with the saturated and the saturated goes all the way
down the one. You know the kind of fat that’s in
there is gonna be the kind that’s good for your body. Healthy fats are going, you’re going to find them
in olive oil and, and peanut oils, umm, canola
oil. (Audience: Inaudible.) Yep, yep. And then the other ones like lard and
butter and umm, those are going to have high
saturated fat. High saturated is what we’re trying, trying to cut
way back on. Remember trans fats? Eliminate it altogether whenever you can. If someone has trans fats in
it, look for something else that doesn’t. Cause
there will be something else that doesn’t. Ummm, the other thing, look at the cholesterol. (Audience: Zero.) There’s no cholesterol, yeah,
that’s a good thing right there. Carbohydrates, very low, so its a good recipe for
that. Look at the fiber high in both, protein good in both. So that’s, you know I just wanted to
highlight that. Too, look at those labels, look at
the nutrition facts on any recipe you’re considering making
and, and, and, and that could very deeply inform
what you choose. That’s why a lot of restaurants are putting the
nutrition facts and, and, umm on their, on their
their menus. Yep, to help people make better, informed
decisions. Okay. Now to this recipe. This is what we did. So I’ve got this whole bowl of shredded cabbage
and this is how I did it. It was the easiest thing
and Jaquel helped me so we could move through it twice as fast do the
same thing. So it was washed, patted dry. Cut off the root. Like that and then cut in half, and just take some
of the big ones that fall off naturally. And then So its cut in half with the root gone. Then I just
put it flat on the cutting board and with a sharp
knife and just go through it. Like little tiny ribbons, real thin ribbons. And I’ll
show you what it looks like once I get through it. Kinda like, you know, how you would cut
ummmm some basil or something else that you would roll
up, right. The cabbage is already in that shape,
it’s already rolled up for you and stacked and then it, you know, it just turns into these little ribbons
right and so when you’re eating something like
this that has a strong flavor and its raw. The, the, the
finer you can get it the more you can ummm, it, the better it’s gonna taste to you. It’s
going to be easier to chew and all of that. And then the other ingredients will, will toss
nicely with it. Alright, so that’s the easiest thing
and, and all of that cabbage was comes from two bags. Two, two, two bags of the
brussels sprouts, it makes a lot. Cause this is a
double batch. Okay, I’ve got the pan heating here, so I’m going
to go ahead and put the walnuts in. And the
reason behind toasting is to bring the taste out. Walnuts are pretty bland on their own, they’re
delicious, but they’re one way for, for those of you who haven’t been here when I’ve done nuts
before, the fastest and best way to bring out the flavor of a nut is too lightly toast it. When you do that, you and stay close to it, cause
they’re easy to burn. The oils are a volatile in nuts, meaning they go
bad quickly. And, and they burn very quickly. So just stay
close, so when you’re doing other things keep
your eye on it and let your nose tell you when it’s ready. If they’re starting to smoke, then it’s probably too
late. You want to try, you want to start over again.
So this is a heavy bottomed pan even if he didn’t have a heavy bottomed pan like
this, you could use a lighter bottom, all the more
reason to stay there and wait. And, you know, l’ll turn the heat up because I’m
so close to it. Okay, so while those are cooking, and if I get distracted, just give me, give me the signal. Cabbage shredded, here are the garbanzo,
chickpeas and it’s just a couple of cans and their drained
and you know, you can go from store brand all
the way up to, you know, Progresso brand. And so, this is two cans, they’re drained and
rinsed, that’s a way to move the, the sodium off of there. There was actually a low
sodium option ahh, so that’s good to keep in mind, when you
looking, if you’re using a lot of canned foods you looking to cut back on sodium. Go, go
ahead and, and get the low sodium. But in any case, low sodium or not. Get in the
habit, if you will, of just, of, of draining and
rinsing. Cause that’s gonna take away a lot. So if you’re
adding a can of, of, of beans or something to
stew, still do that. Because if you just pour the whole liquid in there,
you really, you can unknowingly add a lot of
sodium. Yeah, a lot. Now that’s a good way. So I’m just going to add
’em here, nothing’s really precise. Cause I, I
doubled the recipe. But everything’s here is just, either a little bit less or a
little bit more. And just make the taste work. So you wanna, you wanna move the, move the nuts around a bit,
so they can get all the different edges done here. These strawberries, by the way, are not for the
salad. They’re just for the plate, they’re just local
strawberries. Gee, on sale and any excuse to eat more fruit is
good. Alright, speaking of which, here’s some
dried cranberries. And…. the reason I have two different kinds here, the
store brand, I looked at the ingredients and
umm, it’s fine. All of, both of ’em have the same ingredients.
Dried cranberries, a little bit of sunflower oil and
sugar, right. But these, for the same amount, same serving
size these have umm 20 grams, so the sugar
accounts for 20 grams extra right and calories
per serving is 100. These, and there’s nothing wrong with these, but
I just wanted to use this as a, as a way of
comparing. They’re delicious, so are these, these have 130
calories per and 29 grams of added sugar. So you see my point? Why not go for the one,
they’re, they’re going to taste virtually identical Why not just take the gift of “Well, there’s 30, I
won’t even recognize, I won’t even realize ever.” But if you did that all the time, think of how that
can add up over the course of a day. It’s amazing
actually it’s amazing and that could be, little things like that, little tricks
like that can get you to your 250 calories reduction each day, or 500 calories reduction.
Every little bit counts are getting to that goal and there’s 30 of ’em right there so. Okay, so what I did, is I just opened the bag,
measure ’em out, and then chop ’em, and theyll,
they’ll mix well in there. industry: I’m sure I put in more than a need to
their Tend to the nuts, I’m starting to smell ’em Can you smell ’em out there? (Audience:
Inaudible.) Okay. Yep, it’s almost there, I’m going to leave them
there another minute. I haven’t gotten the
warning sign from Jaquel yet. The lemon juice, I think it’s 4…2 tablespoons?
(Audience: 2 tablespoons.) Okay, so I will put in 4. Since this is double and I have a lot more lemon
juice than, than I probably need. Umm, but I’ll holf off until I taste it, I don’t want to
go too much. And I might end up putting a little bit of ahh pinch
of sugar in here, don’t know. And now here’s the olive oil measured that out, so this is is exactly 6
tablespoons. So a single recipe it would be
three. So I’m gonna do that right. And, I’m gonna call these done. (Audience: Yes.) And what I did is I brought a plate so that when I take ’em off the heat, I can leave
them in a single layer. Turn the heat off here. Leave ’em in a single
layer until they cool. When they cool is when I’ll
cut them and that’s when they’ll be chrispy. If I were to cut them right now they’d be kind of
soft. it still taste good but… alright now I’m gonna toss this, and I’m gonna put some salt and there
too. I mean this salad is, its a beautiful salad
right it’s real colorful and it might benefit from or cranberries, it might
want more lemon. What’s that? (Audience: Inaudible.) This is brussels sprouts. Yep. (Audience:
Inaudible.) You can, if you like it by all means. (Audience: It doesn’t taste like
cabbage.) It doesn’t, well, you know why doesn’t taste like
cabbage? Because it’s not cabbage. It’s in the
same family. The walnuts are gonna add a lot of flavor, the
walnuts are gonna add crunch and ahh, what else am I? What you think about
putting, the recipe doesn’t call for this, but
brussels sprouts & red onions go together well. (Auidence: Yes.) What do you think about me fine
chopping a red onion? Alright. Excellent, alright, I’m going to do that. But first I’m
going to chop the walnuts. See how crunchy they
are already and you just go through ’em. Coarsely and you’d be amazed. Sometimes, sometime at
home do the taste test. Taste a walnut before, you, you, you toast them and then taste it after
and it is like a different (Audience: Inaudible.) a different animal when you do it. (sounds of chopping) Alright. Okay, I’m going to put it back on the plate, they’re
still a little, little warm, which is not a problem. Okay, now I’ll chop up the onion, I won’t put too
much in there, just enough to give it a bite. Right? (Audience: Inaudible.) Okay, well I don’t want to
overpower it, so I’m not going to put this whole
onion in. (Audience: Oh no, that’s too big.) Yeah, alright take that off. So I, I usually just cut the two ends
of an onion off. And then, take that outer, outer and then just
really, really, really thin slices all the way through. (Audience: Inaudible.) And I’ll probably just do half of this, so, sliced it
all the way through, that way right, very thin. And then turn it like that and then just do exactly
the same thing, right. Almost, almost the same way that I, well pretty much the
same way I did the brussels sprouts. Right little, as thin as possible, my knife is
starting to dull, because I’ve done so much
cutting today. I’m still getting the job done though, it’s just a
little bit more effort to do so. Alright, so there, look at how tiny that brought it
up into little teeny pieces. (Audience: Oh yeah.) So it’s worth it to get goood at those, those, those
skills, because you save yourself so much time later on. So it may take a little bit extra effort to
get that, that, that thin cut initially but… Use the back of the knife and then I don’t have to
use my hands, so add that, and… okay. Toss it well, cause it could be that these walnuts
are what tie it together, right, so since we’re serving it right now, I’m adding the
walnuts but I wouldn’t add the walnuts if I was
gonna refrigerated it and then serve it later. I would have the walnuts
ready for last minute tossing. Cause they would get kind of mushy. We’ll try that. (sounds of the salad being tossed) It has that, it has that aftertaste of, you know, that
back taste of, of cabbage, it really does. All right now remember at home if you make this, and
you say “I want the walnuts to have a stronger
presence in this”. Add some walnuts. Or I want the cranberries to have a stronger
presence in this, etc. Do that and remember for
things alike walnuts for the cranberries you’ll have, you’ll have to say oaky, so per serving this is 130 calories, but if I’m adding more walnuts you just take that into account. And say okay, it’s just little bit more. It’s gonna be a little higher in calories. But the nuts are good, good source of fat. Okay, I would say that’s ready to taste and then you guys can adjust as you want. If overcooking brussels sprouts is easy to do and it’s hot, it’s a hot day or, you know, you’ve got access to them and you don’t cook ’em, eat ’em raw like, like a coleslaw.