New CACFP Meal Patterns

New CACFP Meal Patterns

September 14, 2019 0 By Ewald Bahringer


So, hello, my name
is Ebonee McCorvey. I’m one of the child
nutrition consultants here. And my coworker Betel is
going to be presenting in just a little bit. Hello, welcome, what
organization are you with? Sorry? What organization are you with? Kitty Corner. Kitty Corner, OK, so
you all are together. Little housekeeping,
the restroom if you didn’t see it on
your way up in the room, is right across the hall. If you’re male,
it’s on the left. If you’re female,
it’s on the right. And I think there’s a water
fountain there somewhere. When may you eat? We’re not going to
go till lunch today. Or at least we hope not
to go over to lunch. So we have a vending machine. Is it downstairs? There’s one next door too. Right below us. And if your phone rings,
please go out into the hall and check it. Don’t disturb the
recording and the room. If you have any questions,
please just raise your hand. I’m OK with making this
interactive as possible. It’s an easy subject. And I think, since we all
have experience with CACFP, then it should
allow for questions. Acknowledgement statement–
this is to say you understand that
this class is not going to cover the entire
scope of what you need to know as a CACFP
sponsor, or site, or however you’re running it. You’re responsible all
manuals, handbooks, alerts, and notices related
to this subject, which is CACFP new meal pattern. Our overview– we’re going to
go going over infant, child, adult. Early implementation– so what
you can be doing right now up until October 1. October 1 is the date
that the new meal pattern is expected
to be rolled out and you are expected
to follow it. A summary, and we’re going to
have some activities hands on, and some resources. Any questions before
we get started? So infants– let me
step over this way. Breastfeeding– if you have
breastfeeding at your childcare site, I don’t know
if this fits in for– OK, then you can be reimbursed. If the mother is going
to breastfeed on site, then you can get
reimbursed for that. You don’t have to have, of
course, a minimum quantity. How will you know what’s
coming out of her breast? And then it’s only allowed
for zero to five months. And you’re saying zero
to five months, maybe, if you’re a child care site? What happened to
the other groups? Its’ now two age groups. And it used to be three. It used to be like the zero to
four, then four to six months, and the older ones. But now, we just have two age
groups– zero to five months, and the six through
11-month-old. And then at the
six months, you can start introducing the solid
foods, as developmentally appropriate. So some of you may be asking,
what are the developmentally appropriate foods? I know with the
Academy of Pediatrics, they recommend your
cereals vegetables, fruits, and then meats. But, of course, when you are
doing this in a normal child care setting,
you’re going to have to adjust based on what
the parents have already introduced them to, and
what the child can handle. Those two stars over
there are just something to draw your attention. You can have whole eggs
and yogurt in the new meal pattern for your infants. So those of you that are
working with infants, how do you usually do
your introduction of food? I wait until the
parents [INAUDIBLE]. And so then that is
what I will go by. So when they enroll and
fill out their paperwork, they’ll pretty much let
me know what they saw and what [INAUDIBLE]. And that’s how we did it there. We wait for what
their parents tell us. So you feel like this
requirement, how they’re talking about it with
the new meal patter, do you feel that this is going
to be a big adjustment for you? No, because most [INAUDIBLE] And then I have an infant. He is five months. And mom says she’s
introducing him to peas, and if we can give him that. And I just told her to put
it down for my teachers and let them know how
much she gives to him, and when she gives it to him. And so then I make sure
they know [INAUDIBLE]. So it’s pretty easy. Yeah, at this age
group, parents’ input is very important. Anybody else with child care? Are you ladies with childcare,
or with the school district? Are we what? Are you with the school district
or with the childcare side? Mm-hm, but we don’t
have any infants. What about you all, no infants? OK, good deal. More nutritious meals,
also for infants– fruits and vegetables requires
both the fruit and vegetables or some kind of
combination of them during their snack for
infants 6 through 11 months. Juice and cheese– no
juice at this level, none, or cheese food, cheese food,
cheese spread, to be served. If you’re wondering what cheese
food or cheese spread is, then that’s going to be where
it has the addition of salt, or sugar, or some kind of
fat, or something like that, to your regular cheese product. Ready to eat cereals are
now allowed for the infants at snack time for the 6
through 11-month-olds. WIC approved cereals– and
this will go also for some of our older children as well– checking the WIC list
for the Texas site will give you a whole host of
cereals that are acceptable. One thing that we will
talk about pretty soon is the sugar
requirement for cereals. So, in general, the
WIC list is acceptable. And PDA would accept
it, if you’re putting it on your meal records. But also check
your sugar content to make sure you’re in
those requirements as well. There’s some examples. I had to shut down the whole
PowerPoint to do that, but OK. So here is our previous meal
pattern, versus the updated. So you can see the
old age groups, zero to three, 4 to 7-month-old,
and 8 to 11-month-old, now broken up into the two here. We have our breast milk and
everything that transfers over. That’s not really any change. It has the cottage
cheese, eggs, and yogurts added in for this
age group over here. Anyone serving infants? So you’re the only one that’s
serving infants in the room. What do you think about
the new meal pattern? Look pretty much the same? Cereals– I mean,
at this age group, you’re not doing too many
things anyway, as far as food. But you’re ready to eat cereals,
including the eggs, yogurt, cheese, as a part of
your meat alternate. And the two age
groups are really it. Any questions? OK. It went forward a little bit. All right, so for
children, next subject is going to be our children
after the age of one. So fruits and vegetables–
limit juice to once per day. That’s throughout the
whole eating occasion. And so if you’re serving
supper just for them, then you could serve juice. But if you are serving
more than one meal to this age group for
CACFP meal pattern, then they can only have it once. So you can choose for
breakfast or for a snack. But you can’t have
it across all. That’s just a
requirement that they started introducing
because they noticed that every day for snack,
the kids were getting juice. Or for breakfast too in the
morning, they’re getting juice. And when you’re
doing this juice, we’re automatically assume
this is what kind of juice? 100% fruit juice. Fruits and vegetable
components are now separate, just like we were talking
about with the infants. So before in the
meal pattern, we could do this on the left side. If we wanted to have an apple
and carrots as our vegetable, all we have to do is
serve 1/4 of a cup as a whole for those
two components. Now, we have to serve 1/8 of
a cup and 1/8 of a cup each to meet that whole requirement. So before, people
would serve maybe pineapples with the lunch. And if you served 1/4 of a cup,
then you met the requirement. Now, we need to make sure we’re
doing separate components. You have to serve a vegetable. You have to serve a fruit. Any questions on that? Are you already doing that? No? Who’s already doing that
kind of requirement? When you’re doing
your menu planning, you’re requiring that you
have a fruit and a vegetable. We are. What about for your
supper program? You’re doing that as well? More whole grains–
they’ve been saying this for a long time,
more whole grains. But in the future– this is not yet. I didn’t put too much
information on this. I think as of October 2019, so
a couple years in the future, they’re going to actually have
a requirement on how you’re going to determine the
contribution of whole grains for this requirement. But for right now,
as it stands, they’re going to say that you need
to have whole grain rich, serving whole grains, at
least one serving per day. And so I put this nice pictorial
up, just so you can see. I think we think
about whole grains, we think about maybe
oats, maybe brown rice. But there’s even more than this. There are just so many whole
grains you can incorporate. If you’re not doing even
like tortillas or something, you can do whole grain
tortillas, whole grain bread. What other kind of
whole grains are you incorporating at your sites? Anyone from ISDs whole grains? No? Are we incorporating
whole grains, anybody? Some? Do we know what whole
grains we’re incorporating? Are we not sure? Corn, wheat, and rice. OK, rice, tortillas. Anyone experiment with
any new ones besides kind of the regular ones? Not at this age group, but in
general we tried out barley. Barley? Did they like it? No. No? They even have barley
infant cereals. But I don’t think
it’s very popular. And wheat berry. Wheat berry? Yeah, that one is a hard one. I don’t even like wheat berry. But I’ve tried it. How do you think you could
incorporate more whole grains into your menu as
it is right now? I know you’re already
incorporating in some way. But with the new meal
pattern, how could you go above and beyond, and
incorporate something? Is anything here sticking out,
like maybe we should try that? Maybe wild rice? Anybody do wild
rice on their menus? Corn, I know corn is on
there somewhere, probably. Any ideas? OK, you’ll have some chance
to practice later on. Grain-based desserts– this
is the hot button topic for the year. People are kind of a little
angry about this one. No grain-based desserts–
what this means is we can’t have the cookies, Nilla
wafers, all those desserts that maybe your kitchen staff
were making by hand, because I think some years ago there was
a requirement that if you wanted to have grain-based desserts,
then if you made it, and put your own grains
into it, put oats into the cobblers and things
like that, then it was OK. Now, they’re saying not at all. They’re supposed to be
updating I think they exhibit A in food buying guide to show
this adjustment by October 1. How many schools or
child care centers is this going to be
a big problem for? Only one? Not really a problem? No, OK, well, that’s cool. So more protein variety– tofu counts. Does anybody serve
tofu on the menu? During lunch. OK, at least you
have it as an option. That’s pretty neat. Meat and meat
alternates may be served in place of entire
grain component at breakfast a maximum
of three times per week. This requirement is
going to come out. It’s going to say, if you
want to serve sausage instead of a biscuit with your
fruit or something in place of the grain, you
can do that up to three times a week and count it
as a meal pattern. For some people,
I think it’ll be a plus, because
they are typically heavy on the starches. Or their kids ask them to have
more meats for breakfast time. Less sugar in the cereals
and yogurt is next– no more than six grams of sugar
per dry ounce for the cereals, and no more than 23 grams
per six ounce in the yogurt. And there’s no
flavor restriction, which is kind of neat, because
I think previously there was guidance out there about
not serving chocolate yogurt, or lemon, or flavor restrictions
for your CACFP crowd. But with the new
guidelines, there’s not going to be any
flavor restrictions. You can serve them apple
pie flavored yogurt. But it just have to meet
the sugar requirements. Milk– unflavored
whole milk, try to stay within my guidelines,
unflavored whole milk must be served to one-year-olds. Unflavored low fat
or fat free milk must be served to two
to five-year-olds. Unflavored low fat, unflavored
fat free, and flavored fat free milk can be served
to six-year-olds and up. Nondairy milk substitutes
are equivalent. So you can already serve those,
which you know those already. And yogurt may be
served in place of milk for adults, which some
adults might rejoice. OK, I thought I could make
that a little bit bigger. You probably can’t
really read that. But this is also available on
the squaremeals.org website there has the comparison
of what the old pattern was to the updated meal pattern. I’m not going to go
through all of it, because you probably can’t
read it on the screen. But it goes through what
we just talked about. And we’re going to pass out
a lot of these resources to you all. So you don’t have
to worry about that. We’ll go over it
anyway, just in case you guys want to have an adult
care one day in the future. I’m hearing a lot of
grumbling there, like no, I don’t want to do that. It’s a pretty quiet group. Are you guys camera shy because
there’s a camera behind us? Is that what it is? OK, I know there’s
a lot of ISDs here. Just to let you guys
know, I spoke to Lana. She’s the one that does– are you all going to be
attending our summer workshop, region 10 summer workshop? A lot of IDs do attend it. They have a lot of classes. We will have them here. And Salina ISD, they will
be taking courses there. I know there’s a lot
of questions as far as what the schools will
be doing whenever it comes to CACFP, because a lot
of you guys are doing at risk. So what we were
planning on doing was having a separate
class for ISDs to do the CACFP meal pattern,
because what you guys have to implement is a little
bit different than what the traditional child care
group would have to do. So it’s not a bad
thing that you’re here. You still will be learning. But just FYI, during
the summer workshop that’s going to
be happening, they will be covering CACFP
meal pattern, specifically for school districts. Just so you know, that
will kind of give you more. And you all can have a Q&A,
because they do the NSLP. So they can help you guys. And as she was talking,
I was looking over some of the USDA memo
that came out specifically for offer versus serve
when it comes to at risk. So at the end of this,
we’ll go over that. So just to briefly
cover for adults– CACFP the age for adults. So we have to cover what the
requirements are with adults. So what I did is I
kind of broke it down with the different components. Minimum serving for
milk is one cup, for breakfast, lunch, separate,
and snack for the adults. With adults, they can get
unflavored or flavored low fat or fat free milk. They can have nondairy
milk substitutions, as long as they have a doctor’s
statement that supports why they cannot have milk. Yogurt may be served in the
place of milk once per day. This is effective with the
new CACFP meal pattern. What’s happening with the
adult daycare, a lot of them don’t want to drink milk. And it goes to waste. And it’s always a fight there. So USDA considered that. And so they said that they
can replace that with yogurt. Some of the best practices is
to serve water as a beverage when there is the yogurt
that’s being replaced. Use nutritional facts
labels to select flavored milk that contains no
more than 22 grams of sugar. I’ve been to some
adult day cares. And sometimes they like
the chocolate milk, just like the kiddos do,
or the strawberry milk. So even for you guys
with the ISD folks, or with the child care groups
that you guys have older kids, the seven, eight
years old, if you are going to be
serving flavored milk, make sure you’re looking
at the sugar content of it. The whole point of this
new CACFP meal pattern is to make it a little
bit more healthier. And we want to consider that. With the yogurt, same
policy with the child care, you have to make sure it’s 23
grams of sugar per six ounces. Child care centers do take
a look at that very closely. It is per 6. Ounces so one of those
Gogurts, those tube yogurts, a lot of them contain
more than that. So you really have
to be very careful when you’re reading
the nutrition labels to make sure it’s not
more than 23 grams of sugar. Moving on to
vegetables and fruits– minimum serving for adults
is half a cup for breakfast. And notice, we broke
down the vegetables as two different components now. So it’s half a cup for veggies,
and half a cup for fruits during lunch and supper. And the same thing for snack,
is half a cup of vegetables and half a cup of fruit. And that is separate during
lunch, supper, and snack. For breakfast, you
don’t have to serve both vegetables and snack. You can pick and choose
whichever one you want to do. Best practices is
to make at least one of the required
component snack a veggie. And that’s not just for
adults– for schools, for child care centers. Our children are not
getting enough vegetables. And that’s the reason why
they’re making the vegetables and the fruit
component separate, because what’s happening is
since it was one component, they would serve two fruits. And that would still
be a reimbursable meal. But at this point,
you can actually do two veggies,
but not two fruits. So more ways to incorporate
serving more vegetables is snack is the
easiest thing that you can do throughout the
day– so making sure that you are serving
at least one vegetables during your snack. Choose whole
fruits, if possible. I know they’re expensive. And there are a lot of promotion
going on with local farms with child care centers,
and with farm to school. I know USDA TDA is
pushing that a lot. Utilize your local
farms to see what you can get, as far as fresh
fruits and vegetables goes. If not fresh, you can utilize
canned, dried, frozen. And that’s also a better option. How many of you guys are
using USDA commodity? You guys are getting that? OK, good. And when you are doing
fruits and vegetables, try to avoid juices. You can only do one
serving of juice per day with the CACFP meal pattern. So even if that is, it
has to be a full strength. It has to be 100% juice. So you always would want
it go for the whole fruits, or the canned or frozen,
versus the juice form. Provide at least one
serving of dark green, red, and orange vegetables. With schools, I know you
guys are required to do that. You have to have the dark red,
orange, subgroup of vegetables. When it comes to CACFP, they’re
a little bit more lenient with that. But that’s why it’s
under the best practice. We recommend that you do that. But you’re not
required to do that. So child care centers,
think about that. What we’re going to
do in a little bit is we’re going to work on
creating your own CACFP menu. So I want you guys
to think of that. And we’re going to be grouping
the ISDs with child care center so you guys can
work together on how you can add the different
subgroups vegetables. For meat and meat alternate,
minimum serving for adults is two ounce for breakfast,
two ounce for lunch and supper, and half a cup for a snack. With the meat and meat
alternate, they are– as far as snack
goes, they’re doing equivalent to cups to ounces. So that goes about one
ounce, a little bit less than one ounce,
when it’s 1/2 cup. But whenever you look at the
meal pattern that they put out, that’s what it
states, is 1/2 a cup of meat and meat alternative. Like Ebonee say,
tofu counts now. That does give a lot of
our vegetarian participants options. With tofu, you want to make
sure you look at the nutrition label ingredients. There’s different
kinds of tofu– soft, hard tofu. So make sure that it is
reimbursable under USDA meal pattern. Meat and meat
alternate may be served in place for breakfast
three times per week. For adults, that would be a good
news, because a lot of them, they want to get their turkey
sausage, and their meat alternate, versus just the
cereal, and the bananas, and stuff that they would get. Best practice usually meats
utilize nuts and legumes when it comes meat
and meat alternate. You don’t always have
to have the meats. That’s why there is
meat alternate, in order for it to be reimbursable. Limit processed meats to no
more than one serving per week. That’s best practices. I know at schools with
large childcare centers, if you are getting a
lot of processed food, I know that’s going
to be harder to do. But, again, best
practice is, if you can, if you can do self prep, that
would be the best option. And then using natural
cheese and low fat or reduced fat
cheeses, if you are going to use that as
your meat alternate. Any questions so far? So lastly, grains minimum
serving for adults is two ounces for breakfast,
two ounces for lunch, and supper, and one
ounce for snack. At least one serving has
to be wholegrain rich. If at a child care center
or an adult care center only serve grain
one time per day, that one serving has
to be wholegrain rich. Breakfast cereal must
contain less than or equal to six grams
of sugar per dry ounce. Again, that’s going to
be tricky, because a lot of the cereals,
unless you’re doing the plain Cheerios, a
lot of those cereals that are targeted
for kids, they are going to have more than six
grams of sugar per dry ounce. It’s per ounce. So take a very good look at that
whenever you guys are ordering your breakfast cereals. Grain-based dessert
are not credible. When Ebonee was,
asking everybody was not concerned about that. Are you guys sure you’re
not concerned about that? Because all of those
Graham crackers, and vanilla wafers, all of that,
it’s going not be reimbursable anymore. So even though this is not
effective as of October 1st, best practice is go
into your pantries, look at your order sheet. Make sure you don’t have
that, because if you are using vendors
to order your food, and they have long shelf lives. You may have a bulk of
them in your pantry. Make sure you get rid of them,
even if you have them now, so that you’re not wasting
that when October 1st get here. Best practice for grains is
provide at least two servings of wholegrain. What you’re required
to do is to serve one serving of wholegrain. But that’s just
minimum requirement. You don’t have to stop there. So if you can serve
more than that, you can. So when we get ready to
do our menu renovation, and you create your own
menu, have that in mind. Put the best practices. CACFR actually has what’s called
a healthier CACFP recognition awards. And they get recognized
for those child care centers that have healthier
options for meals, and not just food-wise. But then child care centers
that do physical activity– so you actually get grants for
utilizing the best practices. So why not incorporate that when
you are creating your menus? OK, any questions
so far with adults? Early implementations– this is
not the new CACFP meal pattern. It’s been on the news
since last year of April. That’s when they released it. What TDA and USDA
wanted to do is have the early
implementation going on. This has not
changed in a decade. Like, literally, they have not
changed the CACFP meal pattern in a decade. So for a lot of
you ISD folks, this may not be a big change,
because you’ve already incorporated a lot of it. But for CACFP child care
centers, those of you that have been operating this
for the past 10, 15 years, it may be a big change for you. So what they want
to do is they wanted to do an early
implementation so that you can kind of get used
to it before everything goes into effect October 1st. So the five things that
you can do right now and still be in compliance
is breastfeeding on site. Did you have any parent
that are breastfeeding? I know you were the only one. OK, the WIC program, which
is funded by the government as well, they’re very
big with breastfeeding. It has tons of benefits. We can have a whole class
on breastfeeding benefits. So USDA is trying to push that
as well, and support that. So why not reimburse the mom
if she’s coming to the center and breastfeeding? So child care center,
even if you guys– do you have infants
in your centers? We do. OK, so what you want to do is
you want to encourage that. You want to print
out flyers from WIC. You can go to WIC website, and
pass out flyers, and encourage parents to do that. And there’s a lot of
parents– and I’ve work at Head Start for
four or five years. And there’s a lot of
parents that want to do it. But they don’t have
the place to do it. Or they’re not
feeling the support. So as a child care
provider, I recommend that you guys push
out, promote that, and make them feel comfortable. And the turnaround
of that is you also are getting reimbursed for it. So it’s a win-win
situation for both ends. Nutrient rich food for infants– whole eggs used to
not be reimbursable. The Institute of
Medicine, along with USDA, they did their research. And they now have
whole eggs available. And there’s more nutrient rich
food available for infants. Meat and meat alternate
in place of grains– we discussed that earlier. That is giving you a
variety options when you’re creating your breakfast menus. Tofu and soy yogurt products– we’re getting more and
more vegetarians, vegans, at our schools, even
the younger ages. So that’s giving
them more options, instead of just
giving them the beans and the legumes in the place
of meat and meat alternate. And there’s a lot
of cool tofu recipes that you guys can utilize. Yogurt in the place of milk for
adults– that’s also something that you can do now. Like I mentioned
earlier, a lot of adults don’t like drinking milk. So the yogurt will
be a good thing. Any questions? So let’s just go over the
summary of the key changes that we went over for summary. You guys can jot that down. This is, basically, the overall
of the new CACFP meal pattern. They added a fourth group that
addresses the older children. The CACFP used to
have the infant meal pattern, which is different. And they had now– the six to 18 used
to be one age group. But if you have a
six-year-old, especially for your average program, and
a 17-year-old who just came out of football practice,
them two are not going to have the same appetite. So they did add a
fourth age group. They did separate the fruits
and vegetables components. Juice may fulfill the entire
vegetable or fruit components for one meal or snack. Be very careful
when you do that, because it has to
be a full strength. Smoothies are
allowed for a snack. But it has to be– it’s not
commercial bought smoothies. It has to be something
that you prepare on site. Do any of you all do
smoothies at your centers? And you guys have
your own recipes? Awesome. DISD is not here is it? I think they have a
smoothie that they do. Breakfast cereals–
less than six grams of sugar per dry ounce. At least one serving of grain
per day must be whole grain. Grain-based dessert
does not count. Going back with the
fruits and vegetables– like I said, you can do two
different vegetables, but not two different fruits. So it has to be a
vegetable or a fruit, or a vegetable and
another vegetable. There was a question as
tomato and avocado considered vegetables or a fruit? What are those? What do you all think? What are tomatoes? Is it a vegetable or a fruit? You all don’t want to guess? [INAUDIBLE] Yes, so avocado and tomato
is considered a vegetable. So you can serve those two
together, and consider that. The leafy greens– if
you have a leafy greens, like green spinach, what
are the serving of that? Because if you cook a spinach,
and you may have a full cup. But then it was
going to shrink down. So the equivalent
for that is one cup of leafy green vegetable
is consider as half a cup of cooked vegetables. So that will be your
half a cup serving. Beans and legumes– for example,
if you have beans and peas, if you have a recipe
that asks for that, can you use that as your
meat, meat alternate, and your vegetables? And the answer is yes
for that, because beans can be as your meat alternate. And peas can be your
vegetable content. You just have to make sure
that you have enough servings to consider it enough for
meat and meat alternate, and vegetable as well. So look at your
recipes very closely. Meat and meat alternate may
be used in place of grains, based on ounce equivalent. So they’re going to actually
be more restrictive, and USDA is still
kind of finishing up the policies on that. But the per ounce
equivalent, whenever you are switching the
serving sizes of a grain compared to the serving sizes
of the meat for breakfast, it has to be per
ounce equivalent. And that’s actually going
to take an effect in 2019. You can use it right now. They are not going to be
very restrictive on how you measure it. But they will release
more policies. And that will take
an effect in 2019. Tofu and soy yogurt
may be used to meat and meet alternate components. Unflavored whole milk must
be served to children. Whole milk used to be a
recommendation now for kids. But now, it’s going
to be a requirement. And for those of you that are
having child care centers, just make sure you train
your staff whenever you are doing food
production records, that they’re not used
to just writing milk, and not breaking down if they’re
serving the fat free milk, or the whole milk. So start training your staff. It’s going to be required
for the one-year-old to have the whole milk. Unflavored low fat
or fat free milk must be served to children
two to five years old. Do not flavor the milk. I’ve been at child care
centers where they just put those Hershey’s
chocolate in the milk, because the kids don’t
like drinking the milk. So make sure they’re
not doing that. It has to be low fat, fat free
milk, for ages two to five. Once they’re over
five-year-olds, school districts, you
all can do flavored milk. But, again, make
sure you’re looking at the nutrient
content, and that it doesn’t have a lot of sugar
in it– same thing with adult cares. If you are serving
yogurt, it must contain no more than 23
grams of sugar per six ounce. Deep fat fried food prepared
on site is not reimbursable. This was [INAUDIBLE] whenever we
were at the national conference last year when the
first comes out. What is it considered? Is it pan fried? A lot of people define
fried food differently. If you’re immersing it in oil. So, basically,
deep fried chicken, if you have the fryer
fries, or whatever, anything that’s immersed in oil
that you are preparing on site, that is not reimbursable. Water must be available
throughout the day. This is not for adults,
but for children. It’s upon request. I know licensing requires it. Now, TDA and USDA
is requiring that. It has to be available
upon request. Parent and guardian may
provide no more than one meal component reimbursable
meal [INAUDIBLE] disability dietary needs. This has a lot of
question around it. So if you have a child,
and the parent or guardian is saying that, I don’t like
the type of bread you have. I want to bring the
bread to my child. They can bring one component. And a lot of child care center
ask if they can do the milk. They didn’t say
that they cannot. So if Johnny only
drinks organic milk, and they don’t like the fat
free milk that you’re serving, they can bring that. Just make sure that
it’s the type of milk that USDA does reimburse. But when you have
that, a lot of parents may take that
another further step, and say, OK, I
want to bring this. And I want to bring that. Just stay within the policy. However, when you are
enrolling, pull out your policy, and saying, this is the case. If a child is disabled, and if
you have a doctor’s statement to back it up, at
that point, yes, it depends on that
situation is acceptable, according to what the
documentation states. But what the new CACFP meal
pattern allows them is they can bring one component
of the reimbursable meal. And At Risk after school, you
guys can do offer versus serve. I know with ISDs, you
guys have [INAUDIBLE]. Are you all doing offer
versus serve right now? Is it for a snack? After school, OK. Offer versus serve, you can
do that for breakfast, lunch, and supper. But it cannot be for a snack. That’s CACFP policy. So if you have that,
you can do that, because I know there’s
the CACFP at risk. And then there is the after
school supper program. Which one are you guys doing? At risk. CACFP at risk, OK. And before we go
to the next slide, with some of the questions
when we were having our conference with TDA– like, for example, with the
one juice limitation per day, a lot of what the
ISDs were asking is, OK, so if the child
is in the NSLP program, and they are having
juices, how do we know if they get a juice
for at risk after school? It makes it easier, because
NSLP is one food program. So whatever component that
they’re receiving at that point does not count. Whenever they come to the at
risk after school program, then that’s a whole
different program. So based on that is what the
one juice per day limitation is, the wholegrain rich. All of what we just discussed
is for that separate program only that requires that. I’m more of a visual person. So just to go over this– would
this be a reimbursable child breakfast? No? OK, so with the new CACFP meal
pattern, what else can we add? You can do vegetables. What else? Meat. Meat and meat alternate,
OK, can do that. Would this be a
reimbursable child’s lunch? I’m seeing yes. And I’m seeing no. No. What can we add? Vegetables, would that make
it a reimbursable meal? And at this point,
if we had, let’s say, peaches over here
instead of broccoli, would that be a reimbursable? No. OK, if we had carrots over here,
would that be reimbursable? Yes. Would that be a
reimbursable snack? Yeah, for a child
care centers, Yeah. Yes? No? Would that be a
reimbursable snack? No, I mean– Yes, no, yes? How many say it’s yes? How many say it’s no? It is, because it has two– with snack, you’re only
required two components. So you have your fruits and
your grains, at this point. For adults, would this
be a reimbursable? For what meal? For breakfast. Oh, I’m sorry. Yeah, its’ OK. So you have your
quiche, your milk. And as this point, can
they decline the milk? No. OK, would this be
a reimbursable? No. Why not? No milk. OK, no milk, would this
be a reimbursable snack? No. Why? Grain. No grains? With snack, you’re not
required to have a grain. It would be reimbursable
under the new meal pattern, because one is a fruit
and one is a vegetable. Yes, exactly, it would
be, because it would be two different components. With the old one, it
was one component. But with the new one, it’s
two different components. You can always have extra. So you just don’t want them
to have fruits and vegetables, you can throw in a cracker,
or milk, or yogurt, and make it reimbursable. Awesome, so any
questions so far? Let’s take a few
minutes of break. We do have coffees
out in the hallways if you need to take
a restroom break. When we come back,
what we’re going to do is a menu renovation. We’ll pass on some of
these childcare center menus that were implemented
with the old CACFP. And I have a worksheet
here, a blank menu planning. So we’ll maybe
have three tables. And you all can work together. It’s a four week cycle menu. So you can have your breakfast,
lunch, supper, or snack, and create your own menus. You have components there. You have your resources
here that you can use, if you kind of draw a blank. You don’t necessarily
have to cheat from here, but just to give
you guys an idea. So we’ll do that. So by the time we
leave out of here, you actually have a
new CACFP meal pattern menu that you can utilize
with their physical at risk school program, or for
a child care center. So we’ll do that
when we come back. So take a 10 minute break. [SIDE CONVERSATION] So if I can have a mix of– I’m going to do one, two,
three, four, five, six. Let’s do four tables. So if I can have a mixture– you all daycare homes? So if two of you guys come over
here, that’s good right there. And let’s switch over here,
because I know all of you guys are schools, right? I think we have Garland– you childcare? And what are you guys? At risk. At risk with school childcare? OK, let’s have you over here. And then are you
with schools, right? Yes. Can I have you on that table? Sure. I’m trying to have
a mix of everyone. Or you can stay over there. So she’s coming to you. And then three schools? OK. You’re with child care, right? I’m with school. You’re with school. You all need to break up. So let’s have one
school over there, because this is all
school right here. Yes, please, sorry. As long as we have a good
mixture, we are good. OK, so everybody will
get a blank worksheet. And we’ll have a sample CACFP
menu that goes on the table as well. It’s a four week cycle menu. So what you guys
do will be doing is working together as a group,
creating your breakfast, lunch, supper, or snack. When you guys were on
break, I passed out about four different handouts. It’s a one pager that describes
the infant meal pattern. On the back of it, it talks
about the new versus the old, and some of the
new implementation. Same thing with the child
and adult care meal pattern, there is a handout
for best practice. There’s another handout for
how to be cost-effective when you are switching, which
will be very helpful for you small child care centers. Are we planning all of
the meals or just the ones that pertain to us? Well, what do you mean? So we’re doing four weeks
of all of the meals? Both of you guys are just
doing at risk, right? Yes. Just do at risk. What age group? Whatever– it’s a
variety of them. OK, let’s have two of you guys
plan one age group, two of you guys plan the other age group. My goal for this
is so that you guys have something to take
home that you can actually take to work, not home, that
you could actually utilize. So you guys are
making your menus up, the question that
they’re asking is what age group do we work with? Discuss within your group. The whole point of
this is so that you have an actual menu that
you take home and utilize when you get to your centers. So if you have different age
groups, kind of break it down. There’s four of you guys. So two of you guys can
work on one age group, and the other of you guys. With the different
age group, only thing that’s going to change
is serving sizes. This is still a new
CACFP meal pattern. So component wise, it’s
going to be the same. So you don’t have to worry
about the serving sizes. Just put the food on there? Yes. So you have a sample menu. And you will say what you will
serve for breakfast, lunch, and snack. As long as you have something
you can take home and utilize. [SIDE CONVERSATION] So some key things
to remember is to make sure you have a
wholegrain rich on whenever you’re doing your grains,
making sure your fruits and vegetables are
separated, not one component. Do utilize meat and meat
alternate for your breakfast. So put all the stuff that we
learned with the new CACFP meal pattern on this. [SIDE CONVERSATION] So I have Lynn Anderson
here to speak to you guys about summer workshops. She’s the one that puts
everything together. Good morning. So many new faces. Are these all ISDs? No. So we hope to have our
flyer up this Friday. We got our first draft. I sent revisions in yesterday. It’s sitting in the office. We hope to have it out Friday. The registration will open
on Friday for the classes. What we’re doing is
we’ve split it up at the end of this year
into four sections. So in Ferris, ISD is going to
host classes on June 27 and 28. They have, I believe, nine
classes they’re hosting. We did find some new
Spanish classes this year that we’re offering. So if that’s a need
in your district, you’ll be happy to know
we have a couple new ones. One is efficiencies
in the workplace. The second one will be
clip it and utensils. Those are all Spanish speaking. So if you’ve got
folks that are having a hard time with English, sign
them up for those classes. The class is free. We are not charging
for summer workshop. The cafeterias will have
food available for breakfast and lunch, and snacks, that
they will be charging for. Ferris is going to charge $2
for breakfast, $4 for lunch. And then they will have
water bottles and snack. In Salina, we’ve got another
six classes going on up in Salina on June 30th. Again, the cafeteria
will be providing food, if they would like to
purchase a meal there. They can bring lunch from
home if they would like. Saline is $2.50 for
breakfast and $5 for lunch. And they will have assorted
beverages and snacks. July 17th through the 21st,
we have two different culinary classes happening in Frisco. And will be a basics
class, which is two days, and an advanced class,
which is two days. To come to the
advanced class, they need to have some
experience in the kitchen. So if you’ve got
brand new people, please don’t put them
in that advanced class. Put them in the basics class. We’re going to teach them
how to hold a knife properly. Then, we will have, on
July 25th through the 26th, here in this building, we have
an additional six more classes. That day, they’re going to be
released for lunch on their own in our neighborhood. Ferris and Salina don’t have
a whole lot of eating options. That’s why we’re
utilizing the cafeterias. But here, we’ve got a
lot more eating options. So they’ll be on their
own for lunch here. So that will be summer workshop. I don’t want to list
out all the classes, because it’s a lot, as
you can see in my notes. But only the flyer
is out on Friday. If it’s not out on Friday,
I’m going to resign on Monday. We will have–
one of the classes here in July is the certified
food manager protection class. So if you’ve got people that
need that certification, that class will be here in July. The testing for it will
be the following week on August 2nd and 3rd. We will hav AM and PM
sessions for the testing. If you have folks that
just need to test, they don’t need
to take the class, they can come and just test. We also have that class
happening April 22nd and 29th. It’s two Saturdays. And then the testing will be
the following week in May. So if anybody is
needing that right now, we have a class open. And Tamika had mentioned
that you guys are going to cover some
of the CACFP new meal pattern that’s going to be
applied to school districts. Yes. In the meal pattern
class we are. But I can give you the
rundown on that right now. You have pre-K in your
buildings, anybody? So the new CACFP meal
pattern affects you, if you’ve got pre-K. The rules for it are this. There’s no more offer versus
serve for that age group. It is serve only. So you’ve got to create a serve
only menu for that pre-K group. They are no longer allowed
to have flavored milk. So no chocolate milk
for those little guys. However, there is no longer the
rule of having a milk choice. So you get to choose the milk
you’re going to serve them. It’s probably going to be
unflavored 1%, is my guess. Anybody going to give
them unflavored skim? Let’s not. Let’s not scare them
off milk forever. So that’s the milk piece. You can only serve them
juice one time a day over all of the eating
periods that day. So if you give them
juice at breakfast, you cannot give
them juice at lunch. If you give them
juice at lunch, they can’t have it for breakfast. Your cereals cannot have more
than six grams of sugar per dry ounce. So if you go on to
the WIC website, those cereals that
are listed there are the cereals that qualify. It’s basically your
plain Cheerios, not honey nut, plain Cheerios,
Rice Krispies, Wheaties, Kix. We have the pictures up. I think they took a picture. Your yogurt cannot have more
than 25 grams per sugar per six ounces. 23 grams. 23, thank you, 23 grams
per six, which most of you are serving four ounce yogurts. That breaks down to 15 grams
for your four ounce yogurts. So why does that affect you? And no more grain-based
desserts for that age group. So if you’re currently
serving a cookie, you’ve got to eliminate
that for that group. The reason this affects you
so severely is at lunch time, pre-K comes in by
themselves, right? So no big deal, here’s your tray
already built. Take it, and go. When do they eat at breakfast? With everybody else. So you’ve got to figure out a
way in your district, something that’s going to work for you, to
keep those pre-K kids separate. So that does that mean
you do a breakfast in the classroom for pre-K? Does that mean after everybody
else eats then your pre-K kids come through and eat? I don’t know. Get with your principals. Find out what’s going to
work in that building, because it may not even be
the same across your district. Garland has how many schools? 72. It may not be the same way
in all 72 of your sites. When you find something that
works really good, if you would send me that, that
would be great, because we would love
to pass those best practices on to districts that
are struggling, because you heard my two brainstorms–
breakfast in the classroom, or feed them after. So if you’ve got something
else, share it, please. So we good on that? And then the claiming– she did clarify, you don’t
have to claim them separately for CACFP. You can just claim them
under NSLP, which makes everything easier for you guys. Yes, and they
clarified you continue to get the additional $0.06
for having your menu certified. That continues with
those pre-K kids. The only thing different
is follow the pre-K menu. We do have a flyer
that I will email it to Ms. Ebonee real quick,
because it just highlights the items that affect our ISDs. Can you email it to Linda
so she can print it out? Is it a one pager? Yes. Can you ask her to print
it so she brings it with the certificates. That way, they can take home. Absolutely. Perfect, thank you so much. You guys good? Yes, thank you. Well, that of clarifies
the little extra questions that we had for our ISDs. Fantastic, our ISDs are special. So now that we
have that covered, while you guys were
doing your activities, a lot of the questions
that we were getting asked was about offer versus served,
and after school snacks. So I do have a
memo here, a couple of things that are
based on offer versus serve that came out from USDA. So I’m just going to go ahead
and read it to you guys, just so that it gives
you extra clarification. So when the new CACFP
meal pattern came, they had been working on
this for several years. So they did get questions. And they did put
them out, the ones that they were
repeatedly getting. So one of the offer
versus serve questions, was how many items may a child
and adult decline in offer versus serve? It says that, if
the at risk program chooses to use offer
versus serve at breakfast, a child or an adult may decline
one food item for the four food items offered. The at risk program may choose
to offer additional food items beyond the four that’s required. So if it’s for breakfast,
you’re required to have four food items. Usually, breakfast
items for CACFP, you just need three components. But when you do an
offer versus serve, you have to do four items. You have to have
extra food items. So, for example, that offer
versus serve breakfast menu may consist of cereal or
toast, which is the two grain options, orange
slices and a banana, two fruit items, and a milk,
which is one food item. In this case, children must
still take three different food items in order for the
meal to be reimbursable, but may decline more
than one food items. In this example, a meal
of cereal, toast, and milk would be reimbursable. This is because two different
grain items and a milk item were selected by the child. The child does not need to
select the fruit or vegetable items in order for the
meal to be reimbursable. So they have the option. This is why offer versus serve. OK, if at risk
after school program chooses to use after
offer versus serve at lunch or supper, a child
can take food items, at least three food item components,
when the five food items are provided. Child or adult may decline up to
two food items out of the five, similar to breakfast. At risk program may choose
to offer different food items within each required components,
providing more choices for the child or adult to
select an option to decline more than two food items. However, this is
where it gets tricky. A child or adult
must take food items from at least three
food components for it to be reimbursable for
lunch or supper, not just three different food items. So you notice it’s
different when it says component and an item. So out of the five
component, they have to take three components. So, for example, if you had
milk, that’s one component. You have turkey, roasted
turkey, and yogurt, that’s two meat and meat alternate. So you have your
roasted and your yogurt. You have your apple slice. That’s your fruit component. Broccoli, that’s your
vegetable component. And then you have bread roll. That’s one grain component. There are many combination of
a child and adult may select. Some of this can
include– for example with this menu
they can get milk, roasted turkey, and a broccoli. That’s three
different component. They have a milk component,
roasted turkey meat component, and a broccoli
that’s one component. Or they can do milk,
broccoli, bread roll. That’s three
different components. They can do yogurt,
apple slice, broccoli. That’s three
different components. However, if a child selects
yogurt and a bread roll, that’s not a reimbursable,
because that’s just two components. They have the meat and
meat alternate for yogurt, and the bread component
for the meal items. I’m sorry. If they selected turkey,
yogurt, and bread, that’s three. But the yogurt, the turkey,
is meat, meat alternate. That’s not a
different component. Although they have
three different items, they only did get two
different components. So be careful whenever you guys
are doing your at risk supper to make sure that
they’re getting all different components. Yes? Does one of those three have
to be a fruit or vegetable? They do not have to be
a fruit or vegetables. As long as out of the five,
make sure they just have– see, right now, they selected
milk, roasted turkey, roll. They didn’t have any
fruits or vegetable. They still got their milk
component, their meat, meat alternate, their
grain component. It does not have to
be a fruit component. And then another question
is, under offer versus serve, may a child or adult decline
a combination of food? It depends. When at risk after
school program chooses to use offer
versus serve at breakfast, at least four food
items must be offered. And a child must take at least
three of those food items and decline only one. Therefore, a child
or an adult may not decline a combination
of food breakfast when four food
items are offered. For example, if you
have this breakfast menu includes a combination of
food and four food items. So this example is you have
milk, which is one item, waffle with strawberries. That’s a combination of
food of grain of the waffle and then the strawberries of
the fruit, and orange slices. In this situation, the
child must take the waffle with strawberries in order for
the milk to be reimbursable. It’s a combination of food. When it’s a
combination, they have to take the combination of food. At risk program may choose to
offer more than four food items at breakfast. It’s recommended that when you
are doing offer versus serve, even though you’re
only required, for example, for breakfast
to offer four components, it’s better that you
offer more, if possible. For lunch and supper, you’re
only required to do five. But they’re declining. So if you give
them extra options, if they don’t see
what they like, at least they have an
extra option to go by. So, for example, if you have
milk, waffle with strawberries, which is a combination
with this situation, they have to take both
waffle and strawberries, since it’s a
combination of food. At least if you have
orange slices, and then there’s a cereal. You see how you have that
extra fourth component? So if they don’t want the
waffles and the strawberries, they can take the cereal,
the orange, and the milk. And you can get a
reimbursable meal. When at risk program chooses
to use offer versus serve at lunch and supper,
at least one food items from each of the required
five food components must be offered. The child or adult
must take food items from at least three
food components in order for the meals to
be reimbursable. Therefore, if a combination
of food contains three or more food components and a total of
five food items are offered, three of which are included
in the combination of food, a child or adult cannot decline
the combination of food. Same thing with the waffle
and strawberry example– so another example
for lunch and supper is if you have milk,
that’s one component. Vegetable and been burrito, so
if you have a bean burrito that has vegetable, that’s
a combination of food that has three food items. You have your grain, which is
the burrito, the vegetables, which is the
vegetable components. And then you have
your beans, which is your meat, meat alternate. And you have your apple. Under this menu, a child must
take the burrito in order for the meal to be reimbursable. At this point, they
cannot decline anything. So if you do have
a combination food, make sure you have extra so
that they can decline it. Any questions so far? And then this was her question. It says, is as a child
or adult required to take a vegetable or fruit
in CACFP offer versus serve? It says, a child or
adult is not required take a vegetable or fruit
when an at risk program does offer versus serve. Under CACFP offer
versus serve, there are no specific food
items or component that the child or
adult must take. A child or adult simply take
three different food items at breakfast and three
different food components a lunch or supper. I think that’s the only
thing that I highlighted that I think you guys can use. So you all feel better about
offer versus serve now? All questions are answered? Awesome, OK, so the last
thing that I have for you guys is helpful resources. On the best practice handout
that I gave you guys, it does have the
web sites on there. If you want it, take it. And these are some
good resources. And I just want to kind
of look at it together. The first one is
for feeding infants. with the new CACFP
meal pattern, I can already tell you that they
are work– you can already see how old this book looks, right? I think this was printed in
’87 or something, no joke. They really are
working on a new one. So hopefully, by the
end of this school year, a new one will come out. But this information does have
a lot of useful information items. So if you have infants in
your child care center, this would be one good
resource that you want to have. Either you can save it
as your favorite tab. Or you can print it
out, and have it. It has– infant feeding is– we actually have a whole
class with infant feeding, because it’s so different
than anything else. So that would be very
helpful for you guys. For child care centers,
nutritional wellness tips for young children, this
is also other resource. It has building a healthy plate
with fruits, with vegetables, meat, meat alternates. There’s very different
things, a lot of good resources,
that you want to– and I actually
feel like we still have some hard copies of this. So if you’re interested,
I can go downstairs and see if we have some that
you can take home with you. Another good resource
is when it comes to CACFP new meal pattern,
NFSMI, or their new name is Institute of Child Nutrition. They create training. You may have taken some
training of their Institute. This is a very resourceful link. It’s training for CACFP. They break it down for
nutrition standards for child care, adult care. And as you can see, there’s
different menus that you can use, activities, you name it. That’s all on here. Choose my plate– I’m sure you’re
familiar with this. One of the questions
that was asked was calorie restriction when
it comes to CACFP, and sodium restrictions, and so forth. That’s not a requirement
when it comes to CACFP, as it is with the NSLP program. They are a little bit
more lenient with CACFP. But if you’re a
child care center, or if you feel more comfortable
having that sodium restriction, even with the younger kids,
this is a good web site, because you can actually plug
in their age, their activity style. And it tells you
the recommendation for their sodium,
calories, and so forth. And then last but not least– this is a menu planning guide. You kind of played around
today with the old menu that you have. This link is not on here. So if you’re interested,
you can write it down. Let me go back. Basically, what it is,
it’s a menu planning guide that is created by Team
Nutrition, which is a USDA web site. And it has different
menus, kid friendly menus. And it’s a really fun book. So if you’re child care, and
you want to revamp your center menu, you can do that. And this is the web site. This one is not on your handout. So you can write it. It’s healthymeals.fns.usda.gov. And I think if you just type
that right there, it will come. You don’t have to
do the other stuff. All right, any questions,
comments, concerns? We’re about 30 minutes
earlier than anticipated. We do have to close out every
training with this statement, like with the way we started,
acknowledgement statement. It states that you
understand and acknowledge that the training
that you’ve completed does not cover the entire
scope of the program, and that you’re responsible
for knowing and understanding all handbooks, manuals, alerts,
notice, and guidance, as well as any other forms
of communication that provide further guidance,
clarification, and instruction on operating the program. Basically, that’s saying that
we were here for four hours. But we covered as much as we
can with the new CACFP meal pattern. But, again, there is still
things that are being added. Just make sure that you’re
visiting our web site. Squaremeals.org is
the TDA website. Region10.org is our website. I do have our
flyer, our brochure, for CACFP, if you’re
interested in taking classes. Our contact information
is on there. We highly recommend that
you utilize our resources. So please do come. And this is the one that Lana
was talking about, thank you Linda, that highlights– and I’ll just pass it along– that highlights
the effects that it has for school districts when
it comes to the new CACFP meal pattern.