Nutrition Series: Tips for Taste Changes, Dry or Sore Mouth

Nutrition Series: Tips for Taste Changes, Dry or Sore Mouth

November 6, 2019 0 By Ewald Bahringer


Nutrition Tips for: Taste Changes, Dry or
Sore Mouth To keep our bodies as strong as possible,
it is important to eat the right types and amounts of food and drink the right types
and amounts of fluids. Protein, fats, carbohydrates, water, vitamins and minerals are all needed
to help our bodies work their best. Nutrition is very important when you have
cancer. The type of cancer you have can change the way your body handles food or fluids. Cancer treatment may also lead to side effects
that change your desire to, or ability to take in needed nutrition. The following information will help you to
understand why it is important to take in enough healthy foods and fluids while you
are receiving cancer treatment. It will also give you some tips for how to follow a nutritious
diet during this time. This video will also provide information to
help manage certain side effects that you could have during your cancer treatment. You
may or may not have any of these side effects. These side effects may happen at different
times during your cancer care. You may want to watch this video again, at a later date,
to review the nutrition tips that meet your needs In this video, we will include ways to deal
with: taste changes; dry mouth or thick saliva; or a sore mouth or throat. Talk to your health care team about any side
effects you may have from your cancer treatment, including concerns with taking in food or
fluids. Be sure to tell your doctor about over-the-counter vitamins or supplements that
you take currently or are thinking about taking. It is important to make sure they are safe
and will not affect your treatment. Your doctor may suggest that you talk to a
registered dietician who can give you ideas for eating and drinking, including the foods
and fluids you should, or should not have, based on your nutrition needs. Taking in the right nutrition during cancer
treatment can help you: maintain your strength to do your everyday activities, like climbing
stairs, lifting laundry baskets or duties at work; maintain your weight and prevent
weight loss during your treatment; manage side effects you may have from your cancer
treatment; lower your chance of getting an infection, and may help you heal faster. Eating and drinking a healthy diet during
this time may not be easy. Here are some tips to help you deal with nutrition problems you
may have during cancer treatment. It is important to remember that each person
responds differently to cancer treatment. You may, or may not, have any of these problems. During cancer treatment, you may find that
food or fluids taste differently than they did before you started treatment. It may take some trial and error to find food
or fluids that taste right to you during this time. For example, if sweet foods do not taste
good, try sour or tart flavors. Or, if food tastes salty, add a sweetener. Season your foods with herbs and spices. Hard candy, like peppermint or lemon drops,
can sometimes help you when you have a bad taste in your mouth. Food or fluids that are cool or at room temperature
are often easier to eat or drink with taste changes. If you have a metallic taste in your mouth,
try using plastic utensils. Sometimes, rinsing your mouth with water to
clear your taste buds, or brushing your teeth before you eat is helpful. Cancer treatment can sometimes cause your
mouth to become dry or your saliva to become thick. This may make it more difficult for
you to eat food. If this happens: Drink 8 to 10, eight ounce glasses of non-caffeinated
fluids each day, unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Drinking fluids can help loosen
or thin the saliva in your mouth to make swallowing easier. You may find it helpful to carry a
water bottle. Eat soft, moist foods, such as smoothies,
yogurt, or pudding. Add liquids such as milk, broth, sauces, or soup to soften your food. Do not eat peanut butter, soft bread, or other
foods that may stick to the top of your mouth. Chew sugarless gum or try sugarless candy. Use plain water to rinse your mouth before
or after meals. Cancer treatment may cause a sore mouth or
sore throat. Some tips to help this problem include: Do not eat foods high in acid such as tomatoes,
or citrus fruits; do not drink juices, such as orange, grapefruit, lemon or lime juice. Do not eat rough or dry foods, such as tough
meats, raw vegetables, pretzels, chips or crackers that can hurt the sore areas in your
mouth or throat. You should also avoid spicy or salty foods, as
well as alcohol and caffeine. Try to eat foods that are soft and creamy,
such as mashed potatoes, yogurt, creamed soups, eggs, or foods that you have pureed in a blender.
Liquid food supplements, such as Boost or Ensure, may be suggested by your health care
team. Do not use any tobacco products. Use straws to keep food or fluids away from
mouth sores. Food or fluids that are cool or at room temperature
are often easier to eat or drink when you have a sore mouth or sore throat. Ask your doctor about using special mouthwashes
to help make your mouth or throat more comfortable. We hope this video has helped you to better
understand ways to maintain a healthy food and fluid intake during your cancer treatment.
Talk to your doctor about the best nutrition plan for you to follow to keep feeling your
best. Write down any questions you might have for
your healthcare team and bring them with you to each appointment. We are honored to care for you during your
cancer treatment. Thank you for choosing The James