Prevent Glaucoma and See 27 Miles Farther

Prevent Glaucoma and See 27 Miles Farther

September 26, 2019 3 By Ewald Bahringer


Prevent Glaucoma and See 27 Miles Farther Glaucoma is a deterioration
of our optic nerve, the nerve that connects
our eyes to our brain, and is second only to cataracts as
the world’s leading cause of blindness. The weird thing is that we
still don’t know what causes it, and so there’s a desperate search for
environmental or dietary influences. The most protective dietary component,
decreasing the odds of glaucoma by 69%— consuming at least one serving
a month of collard greens or kale. Just once a month or more. And the silver and bronze
medals go to weekly carrot, and then peach, consumption. We think it may be the
lutein and zeaxanthin, two yellow plant pigments
found mostly in greens, that seem to know
right where to go. They hone right in to our retinas,
and appear to protect against degenerative eye disease. Lycopene is the red pigment in tomatoes
so protective against prostate cancer. Guess where it goes when a man eats
a tomato? Straight to the prostate. Beta-carotene in foods may
prevent ovarian cancer— builds up in the ovaries. And where does our body need
the lutein and zeaxanthin? In our retinas, to protect our eyesight,
and that’s exactly where it goes. They not only protect,
but improve our vision. Their peak light absorbance
just so happens to be just the wavelength of color
of our planet’s sky. And so, by filtering out that blue haze,
on a clear day standing on top of a mountain, individuals
with high macular pigment— lutein and zeaxanthin
phytonutrients from greens— may be able to distinguish distant
mountain ridges up to 27 miles further than individuals with little or no pigment.