Raw Veggies Versus Cooked for Heart Disease

Raw Veggies Versus Cooked for Heart Disease

October 12, 2019 6 By Ewald Bahringer


“Raw Veggies Versus Cooked for Heart Disease” In this recent study of
50,000 men and women, those who ate the most apples
appeared to have significantly less risk of having a heart attack
in the eight years they were followed. But those drinking apple juice
appeared to increase their risk. That makes sense. Apples, like all whole plant foods,
are packed with fiber, which may lower cholesterol,
whereas juice consumption— no fiber, just sugar—has been tied
to the risk of diseases like diabetes. So, nothing new here,
but what about this one? 20,000 men and women
followed for ten years. An estimated 34% lower risk
of coronary heart disease for those with a high intake of
fruits and vegetables. But, they went a step further and
compared raw versus cooked. No such study, focusing specifically
on raw versus processed fruit and vegetable
consumption in relation to coronary heart disease incidence,
has ever been done, until now. What do you think they found? Well, in the past we’ve learned that
daily salad consumption, for example, may significantly decrease one’s risk
of dying from heart disease. In this study of 11,000 vegetarians
and other health-conscious people, daily consumption of raw salad was
associated with a 26% reduction in mortality from
ischemic heart disease. So we know raw is good. At the same time, we’ve known for 15
years that phytonutrients like lycopene, in tomatoes, appear protective
against heart disease— and cooking dramatically boosts
lycopene bioavailability. This was actually an interesting study. It’s hard to trust what people tell you
about what they eat, so instead, people admitted to the hospital for
heart attacks had a plug of fat tissue taken from their butt, and just had it
analyzed to basically confirm how much tomato sauce they
had really been eating. So anyway, raw or cooked for
heart disease prevention? And you probably guessed it—
the answer is both.