Top 6 Mineral Deficiencies You Likely Have

Top 6 Mineral Deficiencies You Likely Have

October 4, 2019 1 By Ewald Bahringer


Hi. Listen if you’re struggling with just
a vague general sense of not being well or you have poor health and it has not
specifically been diagnosed as an underlying medical condition
– why you’re experiencing poor health, this segment, this clip is so important
for you to watch because I want to reveal what I feel like is one of the
potential contributing factors to why you may feel that way. It has to do with
mineral deficiencies in this video I want to talk about the six top mineral
deficiencies how and why those deficiencies can contribute to poor
health and well-being now there are inspirational moments of insight and
learning that can change your life and I feel like this is one of them my name is
dr. Ryan Shelton and I’ve been studying the importance of mineral deficiencies
for nearly two decades and it’s an underappreciated contributing factor to
why you may not feel well and why you may have poor health if you have not
been specifically diagnosed with an underlying contributing factor medically
speaking as to why that might be now minerals and mineral deficiencies affect
every system in the body and it’s important to me because I want to talk
about how common it is how they can contribute to poor health and poor
wellness and some basic steps to take to correct mineral deficiencies the topic
of minerals and how they contribute to health could take up hundreds of pages
in a nutritional textbook I could lecture on the importance of minerals
and their deficiencies for hours so I’m going to edit this down to just a
segment that’s tolerable for you so that you can learn what steps to take if you
have mineral deficiencies now when we think about nutrition
there are basically two categories macro-nutrients which are proteins and
carbohydrates fats and fiber and micronutrients the vitamins and minerals
when we think about micronutrients we typically think about the importance of
vitamins and vitamins are critically important for your body to work well but
minerals are equally important and they’re frankly often overlooked and
underappreciated minerals are considered coenzymes for your body to work enzymes
basically control everything in every system in your body from hormones to
neurotransmitters muscles heart health blood pressure every system in your body
basically runs and churns on enzymes and nearly all enzymes require minerals and
if they’re deficient in those minerals those enzymes do not work as well now
it’s important to note first of all that supplementation and the recommended
dosages should be considered case-by-case based on your pre-existing
medical conditions and based on other minerals you might be taking because as
you’ll learn if you take too much of any one mineral you can disrupt the
absorption of other minerals so I encourage you to work with someone who
really knows what they’re talking about when it comes to mineral supplementation
because if you take too little or too much it’s gonna cause problems for the
body how do you determine how do you diagnose if you have a mineral
deficiency the first step is is just to learn about what the symptoms of
deficiencies are and the second step is to get some laboratory testing to
confirm those deficiencies now some minerals are fairly straightforward and
easy to diagnose in terms of deficiencies like iron and iodine
calcium potassium those minerals are tightly regulated in the body and there
are convey general standard lab testing that can
provide you great information about what your standing are on those minerals
other minerals deficiencies other mineral deficiencies are more difficult
to diagnose because they’re within the cells they’re not freely floating around
in the bloodstream so a typical phlebotomy or blood test may not pick
them up as easily they’re within the cells and there are specialty labs which
take samples of your cells grow them in Petri dishes to help determine if you
have micronutrient deficiencies of minerals specifically minerals like
magnesium and zinc so micronutrient testing measures how micronutrients are
actually functioning within yourself these tests allow nutritional assessment
for clinical conditions general wellness and the prevention of chronic diseases
like arthritis cancer cardiovascular risk diabetes immune system health and
metabolic disorders so let’s talk about this six minerals the first one is iron
iron is an essential mineral it’s a main component of red blood cells where it
binds with hemoglobin and transport oxygen to every cell in your body it’s
important for the electron transport chain which involves energy production
in the body the production of thyroid hormones the production of dopamine in
the brain there are actually two sources of dietary iron one is heme iron this is
typically very well absorbed and it’s only found in animal foods and red meat
particularly contains high amounts of heme iron and then there’s non heme iron
this type of iron is much more prevalent much more common in our food chain in
our food system but it’s not as well absorbed as heme iron so it’s in the the
vegetable kingdom the fruit kingdom but it’s not quite well as absorbed as heme
iron iron deficiency is one of the most common nutrient
in seas in the world affecting more than 25% of the world population
approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide and this number unfortunately
rises to about 47% in pre-school children unless they’re given iron rich
or iron fortified foods they’re very likely to be deficient in iron 30% of
menstruating women may be deficient as well due to monthly blood loss up to 42
percent of young pregnant women may also suffer from iron deficiency so what are
the contributing factors to perhaps why you’re deficient an iron high booklet
hydrea so low stomach acid stomach acid is required to absorb iron certain
medications inhibit the absorption of iron or mega supplementation with other
important minerals like zinc or copper or manganese these can inhibit the
absorption of iron and a large intake of beans legumes or grains because of some
phytates and lignans found in beans legumes and
grains can also inhibit the absorption of iron
additionally vegetarians and vegans have an increased risk of deficiency they
consume only non heme iron which is not as well absorbed as heme iron the most
common consequence of iron deficiency is anemia the quantity of red blood cells
is decreased and the blood becomes less able to carry the all-important oxygen
to every cell in the body throughout the body symptoms of anemia are fairly well
known they include tiredness weakness weakened immune system impaired brain
function blue sclera which is the white part of your eyes
becomes slightly bluish when your iron deficient which is more common in vegans
and vegetarians and beet urea so if you’re an individual that consumes beets
and when you look at your urine or your pee it has a red tint to it that may
be a sign of iron deficiency the best dietary sources of heme iron include
meats organ meats fish shellfish canned tuna canned sardines the best sources of non-homogeneities and legumes those
phytates and lignans can inhibit the absorption of non heme iron vegetarian
sources include broccoli kale spinach in fact one ounce of kale provides about
five to six percent of recommended dietary intake however you should never
supplement with iron unless you truly need it because too much can be
pro-inflammatory for the body and frankly increase your risk factor for
cardiovascular disease stroke cancer other health conditions
additionally vitamin C can enhance the absorption of iron so eating vitamin C
rich foods like oranges and kale and bell peppers during the consumption of
iron rich foods can be beneficial now the best way to take iron is in divided
doses throughout the day I would recommend maybe thirty milligrams three
times a day and it may take six to nine weeks to show improvements within your
body if you are deficient in iron my favorite form of a supplement is called
ferrous bisque glisteny because it may be better absorbed than other sources of
iron next let’s talk about iodine iodine is an essential mineral for normal
thyroid function and the production of thyroid hormones thyroid hormones are
involved in many processes in the body such as growth brain development bone
maintenance they also regulate the metabolic rate I think of thyroid as
kind of an accelerator on your car if you’re pushing too much on the gas or
the accelerator you you reach that redline and
the engine your body is just running too fast if you press too little on the
accelerator you don’t go anywhere you suffer from fatigue and weight gain iron
deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in the world it
affects nearly one-third of the world’s population the most common symptoms of
iodine deficiency is an enlarged thyroid gland also known as Gorder it
contributes to an increased heart rate shortness of breath and weight gain
severe iron iodine deficiency may also include serious adverse effects
especially in children excess intake of selenium calcium and vitamin A may also
inhibit the intestinal absorption of iodine iodine again is an essential
mineral found in every cell in your body deficiencies can result in dry mouth dry
skin lack of sweating weight gain enlarged thyroid gland increased heart
rate shortness of breath dietary sources include eggs fish dairy spirulina and
sea vegetables such as kelp kombucha and other seaweeds iodized salt obviously is
a sort of source of iodine and if you take an iodine supplement be aware of
the potential serious side effects or risk factors with taking too much iodine
the recommendations for iodine intake tend to be in the range of about 75 to
150 micrograms per day and again it’s a it’s a supplement it’s a mineral that
you have to supplement with caution because too much can cause problems if
third mineral I want to talk about is calcium calcium is essential for every
cell in the body it min arises bone and teeth especially during times of rapid
growth and development it’s also helpful for the maintenance of heart health and
insulin control so the importance of calcium extremely important vitamin D is
required for that’s why one of the most common
symptoms of calcium deficiency is osteoporosis or rickets in younger
individuals one survey found that in the u.s. less than 15% of teenage girls and
less than 10% of women over the age of 50 met the recommendation met the daily
recommendation of calcium intake in the same survey less than 22 percent of
young or teenage boys and men over 50 met the recommendation of daily calcium
intake symptoms of more severe dietary calcium intake include certainly
osteoporosis and rickets now dietary sources of calcium include
bombed fish dairy products dark lean dark leafy green vegetables such as kale
spinach bok choy broccoli the effectiveness and safety of calcium
supplements have been somewhat debated in the last few years some studies have
found that an increased risk can occur for cardiovascular disease if you’re
taking too much calcium although it’s best to get calcium from food rather
than supplements like so many of these minerals so foods sort of like a Paleo
diet rich in grass-fed meats free-range poultry vegetables fruits nuts seeds and
so on calcium is absolutely vital for the aspects of health from bone health
metabolism immune health for heart health and a deficiency can be
absolutely detrimental now if you’re over the ages of 50 the recommended
total intake of calcium daily is about 1,200 milligrams so that’s dietary
sources plus any supplements that you’re taking and taking more than that is
actually contraindicated tablets are not as well absorbed as say capsules or
powders if you take too much calcium you can suffer from kidney stones an
increased risk of urinary tract in fact and cardiovascular disease certain
prescriptions and too much intake of phosphorus which frankly is in cans soda
or bottled soda Cola products phosphorous is high in soda or Cola
products can inhibit calcium intake and it’s also recommended to take calcium
along with magnesium which is a great segue into magnesium magnesium is a key
mineral in the body it’s essential for bone and teeth structure it’s also
involved in more than 300 enzyme reactions almost half of the US
population 48 percent consume less than the required amount of magnesium between
the years of 2004 and 2007 low intake and low blood levels of magnesium have
been associated with several diseases including diabetes metabolic syndrome
heart disease and osteoporosis low levels of magnesium particularly common
among hospital patients and among individuals over the age of 50 and this
can cause havoc on the entire body system more subtle learn long term
symptoms that you may not notice include insulin resistance and high blood
pressure now some foods that are rich in
magnesium include nuts and seeds dark chocolate leafy green vegetables and I
would encourage you to take those in as often as you can because magnesium is
the fourth most abundant mineral in your body a deficiency can wreak havoc on
your entire system the fact that researchers have detected more than 3750
magnesium binding sites on human protein should give you a sense of how important
the mineral is for your body’s optimal functioning for muscles for nerves for
activating ATP or adenosine triphosphate which is basically the energy producer
in the body it helps digest proteins carbohydrates and fats it serves as a
building block for RNA and DNA synthesis your genes
and it acts as a precursor for many neurotransmitters such as serotonin now
contributors to magnesium deficiency are vast
they include certain medications low levels of stomach acid dietary sources
of magnesium include avocados nuts and seeds brown rice dark leafy green
vegetables oily fish raw cacao seaweed and since there’s no simple routine
blood test to determine your magnesium levels you may need to use one of those
specialty labs personally on my patients I use a lab called spectra cell
deficiencies of magnesium can include constipation eye twitches muscle spasm
headaches and migraines high blood pressure heart arrhythmias irregular
heartbeats coronary spasms low energy fatigue and loss of appetite so for
magnesium the human body contains approximately between 28 and 28 grams of
magnesium 60% of that is found in bone 40% of that is found in cells absorption
decreases with intake and that’s important to know because if you try to
megadose with magnesium you systematically decrease the percentage
of magnesium that you’re able to absorb again the systems that deficiencies of
magnesium can affect cardiovascular system the skin ee and t so the eyes
ears nose and throat the musculoskeletal system the neurological system or mood
and mentality the ob/gyns system the pulmonary systems a breathing system in
take over the age of 40 is suspected and recommended to be above 420 milligrams
for males and 320 milligrams for females deficiencies can be caused by stress
processed foods and fertilizers in our production of produce fertilizers
decrease 25 to 30 percent the magnesium availability
in our produce between the years of 1940 and 2000 again prescription medications
can decrease magnesium absorption what seems to help a medium that absorption
calcium intake potassium intake vitamin b6 and vitamin b1 also known as thiamine
the best source of magnesium happens to be the magnesium sole magnesium
aspartate the next mineral I want to talk about is potassium potassium is
mostly inside cells sodium is mostly outside cells now the ratio of sodium
added to a potassium has changed dramatically since the hunter-gatherer
days because potassium is mostly in hunter-gatherer paleo type foods and the
recent research shows that about a third as much as a half of individuals
presently are consuming far less potassium and they need to be certain
certain prescription medications like antibiotics and diuretics can decrease
your potassium levels potassium is high and veggies beans and legumes nuts and
seeds fruits meats and dairy potassium deficiency can contribute to
cardiovascular disease fatigue muscle cramps interestingly about potassium is
that there’s a difference between boiled and steamed foods with boiled foods
about 10 to 50 % of potassium is lost compared to steamed foods where only 3
to 6 percent of potassium is lost food is best food is always best for these
minerals in fact the FDA has limited the potassium of supplements to 99
milligrams per serving and the best source is potassium aspartate always
take with magnesium the next mineral I want to talk about is zinc at least 2
billion people worldwide are thought to be zinc deficient and it’s due to a
number of reasons our processes of farming and our changes in dietary
habits dietary sources of zinc include dairy products nuts red meat eggs
seafood plant sources of zinc are slightly less
well absorbed than animal of dairy eggs sources if you’re an alcoholic or
vegetarian you’re pregnant or lactating or if you have a digestive order you’re
more likely to be deficient in zinc zinc is important for DNA and protein
synthesis vision hearing taste sexual development wound healing immune
function and skin health zinc is thought to be an aphrodisiac and help sperm
production in men but it will only raise testosterone levels if the if the user
is deficient in zinc and very high doses zinc and ASP act as an aromatase
inhibitor in females and reduce estrogen levels so use with caution if you’re
menopausal postmenopausal zinc is lost through sweat making supplementation
very important for for athletes that don’t get a lot of heisting foods if
you’re over 20 the recommended daily intake for males is about 11 milligrams
for females about 8 milligrams I would say that the maximum daily dose of
seeing supplementation may be around 40 milligrams per day and it’s actually
important to take copper along with zinc because excess intake of zinc can
actually cause copper deficiency and the best form of zinc that I like to use is
zinc piccalilli now it’s always important when you’re taking a mineral
to look at what salt it is it’s always zinc with a salt so it may be zinc
sulfate zinc gluconate zinc monomyth thiamine and elemental zinc is absorbed
very differently in each of those salts and elemental zinc which is what’s
listed on the label is different than than say the the actual intake of the
zinc salt that you need to take so if is ink sulfate you need to take maybe as
much as two hundred and twenty milligrams of zinc sulfate if it’s zinc
gluconate maybe as much as three hundred and eighty milligrams of zinc gluconate
and if it’s zinc meth I mean you may need to take about the same about two
hundred and thirty milligrams and this is common with most minerals so you need
to understand what mineral salt it is now mineral deficiencies again are
common and contribute to poor health I want to know what you’ve experienced
with mineral deficiencies I want to know what your experience is with health so
that I can fine tune how much elemental minerals that you’re taking in I’m
honored and impressed with your time and attention to learn about your health and
wellness we’ve actually created a supplement called pure greens which is a
greens powder high in minerals but well absorbed because they’re complexed with
their original foods I encourage you to check that out it’s a safer way than
mega doses of individual minerals I believe in the original meaning of the
word dr. dole catering which is teacher and I’m here to take you by your hand
and help teach you about the importance of mineral deficiencies we have a
Facebook page I want you to check out an Instagram page I want you to check out a
website Zenith labs.com I want you to check out so that you can
learn more about your health certainly subscribe to this page share with your
friends and loved ones so that you can share in the benefits of
research that has been going on for decades about mineral deficiencies again
thanks so much for your time. I’m Dr. Ryan Shelton.