What is PMDD [Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder]?

What is PMDD [Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder]?

October 15, 2019 40 By Ewald Bahringer


(soft somber music) – Wow, (laughing) I’m already crying and I just started talking. ♪ Cause I’m not gonna take anymore ♪ ♪ No I’m not gonna take anymore ♪ – PMDD is a lot of things. – It’s absolutely hell. It is like you’re possessed. – You don’t feel like the same person. – PMDD is life-changing. – Crushing blows and life wrecking, crushing, horrific pits that I go into. – Lying and sugar coating
is not gonna help anybody. It’s not gonna fix any problem,
so I’m gonna be honest. – For those of you who don’t know, PMDD is characterized
by symptoms that begin at around ovulation and they end within a couple days of starting your period. – And it’s daunting because I know that I’m just a couple of weeks away from having it happen
again and again and again, maybe for decades. – PMDD is my brain not knowing what to do with my hormonal fluctuations. – Symptoms include deep
depression, crippling anxiety, memory loss, brain fog, binge eating, uncontrollable rage, thoughts of violence, suicidality, self-harm. – Hell. It’s hell. – It saps out every single
hope that you have left. – And it’s the way that
it affects not just you, it affects every person around you, your family, your boyfriend, your friends, your social life, your working life. It’s a constant fight every single month because you just do not
have any control over it. – So I spent a lot of
time beating myself up for not being healthy, not knowing that it was something physical and I thought it was like a character flaw or a personality flaw and
there were people that I knew that thought so too and I believed them. – It can be very damaging. – You’re going to your doctors. You’re taking the medication. You’re even supplementing,
you’re eating healthy, you’re working out, you’re meditating, you’re doing everything
what you’re supposed to do and sometimes above and beyond
and it’s still not enough. – You really just go into survival and that survival becomes depression and depression becomes denial and denial becomes survival
and survival is barely living. – There were so many times where I thought that I would lose
my life to this illness. – Tried to kill myself I think three times while I was not in my right mind. – I’ve experienced very
bad suicidal episode and I actually tried to commit suicide. – And I just woke up the next day feeling so, so glad that I was
not able to follow through. – My therapist wrote in the report that I was pretending and I was making it up. (soft somber music) – And there isn’t enough awareness and I can’t believe
that I’ve gone this long not ever even knowing that
this was a thing, a disorder. It’s (crying) – Honestly, the lack of awareness, it contributes to
misery, legitimate misery for a great many people. – It is so, so, so, so, so important that women all over the
world, all over the world are educated about PMDD
because I bet there’s so many women out there who have it and who don’t get treatment. – It’s very, very sad to
know that lots of other women out there, people out there
who are suffering in silence and they don’t have anywhere to go, just like I didn’t have anywhere to go and have the support that
I actually do deserve and I shouldn’t feel ashamed. I shouldn’t feel like I can’t talk about any of this anymore. – And then the awareness
came in and two years ago when my doctor diagnosed me, was a huge day for me. I mean it was like, thank
you god, I have PMDD. I know what I have and
it didn’t obviously help the symptoms and it
didn’t take anything away, but what it did give me was
the beginning of a platform of a place to build and
know that I am not crazy and I’m not gonna die and
I’m gonna keep moving forward and I’m gonna try to find something. – And just knowing has helped so much. I know the medications to
take, the supplements to take. I know what to watch for. I am just more aware. – We need more awareness for PMDD because most providers have no
idea either what PMDD is or what it means for the sufferer so they often will think it’s
just a severe form of PMS when really it’s so much more than that. – If there was more information available and more people were more
knowledgeable about PMDD, it may be easier to diagnose and therefore easier for sufferers to
find solutions to it. – To fuel funding so we
can better understand PMDD and have more realistic treatments for it. – And this is a conversation
that desperately needs to grow larger so that we can
improve diagnosis and treatment for all women. – But the awareness has been everything. It’s been really, really important and I think the biggest
thing is it’s given me a network of women to relate
with and share stories with and I have questions that come up and I know exactly where to go to ask. I don’t ask my doctors. I ask these women. – If I could go back and
tell myself one thing. – It’s not just hormones. – This is not who you are and how you feel is not who you are and you’re
a lot bigger than that. – You’re not crazy. – It’s not your fault. – It does get better once you find the right treatment regiment. – Advocate for your health because you are the only one that knows your body 24/7. Your doctor barely gets a
glimpse of your symptoms that you live daily. – And if you need help, go get help today. (soft calming piano music) – (crying) If you have
PMDD and don’t know, then just keep fighting and do what is right for you. (energetic electronic music) ♪ Tell me that I’m good enough ♪ ♪ Tell me that I’m good enough ♪ ♪ Tell me that I’m good enough ♪ ♪ Tell me that I’m good enough ♪ ♪ Tell me that I’m good ♪