What Will Happen If You Suddenly Stop Dreaming

What Will Happen If You Suddenly Stop Dreaming

October 15, 2019 100 By Ewald Bahringer


Some dreams you don’t ever want to wake
up from. Others have you wishing you’d never dream
again! But have you ever wondered what would happen
if you no longer dreamed? Well, for starters… 1. Trouble learning new things
Sleep studies show that the brain is still very active during REM (or Rapid Eye Movement)
sleep, the stage of snoozing when dreams occur. Apparently, your eyes are bouncing around
in your head at this time, but what’s your brain up to? (Besides flying on a talking dinosaur or running
from whatever’s chasing you…) The most common theory is that dreaming helps
your brain store memories. In short, dreams are like exercise for the
brain – they keep your mind healthy so that it can learn, problem-solve, and analyze. If you stopped dreaming, you’d lose that
valuable brain training. 2. The physical damage
REM sleep is the deepest part of your sleep cycle when your body is getting the most beneficial
rest. REM sleep is important because this is when
our cells grow, heal, and renew. If you aren’t reaching this stage (in other
words, you’re not dreaming), your body isn’t getting this replenishment. You might have skin problems, weight gain,
a weakened immune system, and all the other unpleasant things sleep deprivation can lead
to. Not to mention… 3. No re-charge
Ideally, you should wake up feeling re-energized. But if you’re not knocked out cold in REM
sleep, then your internal battery isn’t getting charged. You might toss and turn all night and feel
groggy the whole next day. Even if you do sleep for 8 solid hours, if
there’s no deep dreaming during that time, it’d be as if you didn’t sleep at all! 4. The toll on mental health
Sleep experts say that dreams help the brain process all the problems that are stressing
out the subconscious. In other words, dreams help us blow off some
mental steam! If you don’t dream, you may begin to suffer
from a mood disorder such as anxiety. Like sleep deprivation, mental exhaustion
and stress can also take a toll on physical health over time. High blood pressure, hair fall, muscle and
joint pain – the list goes on… In this case, seeing a doctor is a must! Especially if you start having… 5. Heart issues
Scientists have recently found a unique relationship between deep sleep and heart rate. It turns out that even when you’re lying
completely still, which the body tends to do during sleep, your heart rate will go up
if you’re dreaming! Your heart rate increases because your brain
is doing some thinking during your dream, and the brain and heart work together. Have you ever woken up in the middle of the
night from a particularly exciting dream that got your heart racing? Exactly! It might sound like it’s bad for your ticker,
but this serves as a sort of exercise for your heart and circulation. 6. Missing out on some deep therapy
All the health stuff aside, let’s delve deeper into the effects this will have on
the subconscious. Your brain uses your memories to come up with
the images, situations, and feelings you see and experience in your dreams. Problems that we face in our dreams are usually,
in some way, associated with challenges we’ve faced in waking life. If you feel like you’re helplessly not in
control within a dream, that probably means there’s something in your life going on
that’s making you feel that way deep inside. Your dream will try to piece these associations
together in a way that’s easier for you to process. If you pay attention to your dreams, it can
be like therapy! You might be asking yourself, what can I do
if I’m not dreaming? Will I ever dream again?! Don’t worry! The truth is, you probably are dreaming – you
just don’t remember it! The average person dreams 3-5 times per night. So, we’ve got 2 tasks here: improve your
chances of dreaming more and recalling them when you wake up. Here’s what you can do… – Start with the basics
The first, most essential step to dreaming is to attain that precious deep state of sleep. We all have a sleep cycle, and we usually
reach the REM state about 90 minutes after falling asleep. REM itself comes in stages, and they get longer
as the night progresses. Some REM stages can be a mere 10 minutes while
later ones can last up to an hour. Long story short, do what works for you to
get good-quality sleep. Drink some hot chamomile tea before bed, turn
the electronics off, keep your bedroom completely silent and dark, change your mattress and
pillows if it’s long overdue. – Psychological tricks
Before you lie down, tell yourself that you want to remember your dreams. Say it out loud if you have to. This trick will prepare your mind to be receptive
to dreams. It’s like a brain exercise and may take
practice, but it will pay off! – Think of a question
More specifically, think of a question you’d like to be answered in your dreams, and write
it down. This will act as a guide and focus for your
dream. If you repeat the question to yourself as
you’re falling asleep, your subconscious will remember it and try to associate it with
something in your dream. – Morning reflections
On average, most people forget their dreams within seconds of waking up. As soon as you open your eyes, don’t immediately
grab your phone. Don’t turn the TV on. Keep all of the electronics quiet. Don’t even move! If you stay completely still for at least
90 seconds after waking up from a dream, you’ll have better chances of remembering it. If you remain in the same body position when
you wake up, the memory of what you just dreamed will hang around longer. Think of it as lingering muscle memory. If that memory comes to you, stew on it. Think about what your dream means to you and
your life specifically. If you can make a meaningful connection, the
entire dream should come back to you! And don’t forget to… – Keep a Dream Diary
Keep a notebook by your bed. When you wake up from a dream, even if it’s
in the middle of the night, write down everything you can remember about it. It doesn’t matter how small or foggy the
detail is. At first, you may only be able to write down
1 or 2 words, and they might not make much sense. But the more you do it, the more of your dream
you’ll be able to remember. Eventually, you’ll be writing down your
entire dream in the morning! Just be sure to do it within 2 minutes of
waking up before you forget it. This bedside dream journal is also the perfect
place to write down that question I mentioned earlier! Even after just seeing the question alone
written on the page, memories of last night’s adventures—and maybe the answer you’re
looking for—should come rushing back to you! – Draw pictures
If it’s 3am and you’ve just woken up from a dream, don’t sweat it if words and sentences
aren’t exactly coming to you like Shakespeare. Draw the landscapes you saw in your dream. If you can, draw any people and objects you
saw or touched. Draw something that represents how you were
feeling in your dream. For example, if you felt free, you can draw
a bird flying. Translating your dream into a hand-drawn picture
should improve your recollection because now you’ll have an image to look at. A picture is worth a thousand words, after
all! – Good nutrition
Yeah, we all know we’re supposed to eat healthy for about a million reasons…but
one of those reasons is to improve your sleep quality! You should know by now that good sleep usually
means a stroll through dreamland. To add a “dream memory boost’ to your
diet, try eating foods that are high in B vitamins. Think poultry, spinach, fish, bananas, and
milk. – Promote Lucid Dreaming
Lucid dreaming is when you know that you’re in a dream. So, that means you’re in control of what’s
happening around you! But the interesting thing is that lucid dreams
are usually easier to remember. And it gets even better: one study showed
that hitting the snooze button for 10 minutes after your first alarm promotes lucid dreaming! The trick is being awake and conscious for
that brief moment and then going straight back to sleep – most people in the study
fell right into a lucid dream. Since it was so quick and they were in control,
they recalled the dream they’d had during their little snooze! Gee, wasn’t that dreamy? Do you usually remember your dreams? Let me know down in the comments! If you learned something new today, give the
video a like and share it with a friend. And here are some other cool videos I think
you’ll enjoy. Just click to the left or right, and stay
on the Bright Side of life!